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Thread: Do You Even Deadlift, Bro?

  1. #11
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    Don't have overtly strong any lifts, but I figure I should chime in here. I find if I do enough lower back work and some upper back work, I can maintain my deadlift and/or even get a small PR. I mostly quit DLing as I stopped seeing any real sport improvement from it (I mostly lift for sport improvement) and I don't believe it is currently a limiting factor in my OL lifts (technique and upper body strength currently is.) For me personally I find once a week doing 5x5, 3 sets of 10, or 2 sets of 20 of either "North Korean Good Mornings" (rounded back stiff leg GMs) or seated good mornings, never going above 135lbs standing and 115 seated. You do get a better result if you do upper back work like face pulls or some sort of strict rowing exercise as well after.

    I just like this approach personally as quite frankly, this takes 5-10 minutes towards the end of a training session to do, and deadlifts take a lot longer, and this is a lot less taxing on recovery and/or the CNS, and at the very least it maintains my deadlift. Also personally, I have quite strong glutes and hams, but a comparatively weaker lower and upper back, so more deadlifting I think just contributes to that muscular imbalance. Just would like to put this out as an option to think about for anyone, it may not work for everyone, but it does work at least to maintain things for me, and takes 5-10 minutes.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wittmer View Post
    Probably doesn't hurt and only helps to a point. I knew a guy with a 320 dead, and a 130 C&J.
    Thats neat. I actually did 130kgs the first time I tried C&Js during the weightlifting-part of a personal trainer-course. I guess how much someone can front squat is a much more important factor.

  3. #13
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    I used to coach them a lot, then went away from it as I became better at coaching the classical lifts. There was just a lot more to do than to drive pulling strength.

    To an extent, it is a case by case basis (obviously), there is a pluralism of backgrounds of people who get into WL and frequently, their strength pulling off the floor is not their problem; getting under the bar is. However, there are always lifters who appear to get a lot out of increasing their pulling strength.

    Currently prescribing both Snatch grip and Clean grip deadlifts and using them in a training block leading up to Junior Worlds. In 14 weeks of training for that particular lifter, the CL DL started at 5x2@200kg and the Sn DL 5x2@150kg..... neither particular stressful to start with and they were used once each per week. No other pull work was prescribed. In week #6 the CL DL is 1x2@235kg and the Sn DL is 1x2@190kg. Again, neither are totally on the limit. This is for a 134/177 lifter.

    Traditional pulls follow this deadlift emphasis as the training block continues. I should also add that these reps finish with the shoulder over the bar, not how they would in a PL meet. Also in lifting shoes; so think of it as a halting SN/CL deadlift.
    Last edited by Hawkpeter; 05-04-2016 at 10:24 PM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leeland View Post
    Thats neat. I actually did 130kgs the first time I tried C&Js during the weightlifting-part of a personal trainer-course. I guess how much someone can front squat is a much more important factor.
    He was a national level powerlifter, but he pretty much showed up at meets and did whatever everyone was doing. Did odd lift meets too. I wouldn't see him getting past 160, even if he completely switched sports. Flexibility and speed just wasn't there.

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    Once a week deadlifts up to a single 200kg. Never pushed it higher but probably could, I've had the 200kg for a while now and it doesn't gas me like it used to. But my clean is right now around 125 as I'm upping my conditioning and spending a bit less time on my lifts.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wittmer View Post
    He was a national level powerlifter, but he pretty much showed up at meets and did whatever everyone was doing. Did odd lift meets too. I wouldn't see him getting past 160, even if he completely switched sports. Flexibility and speed just wasn't there.
    You have to be retard level uncoordinated to not be able to at least power clean 50% of your deadlift. Within a few weeks to months of power cleaning most everyone can get to 50% of their best deadlift as long as deadlift does not = sumo with low ROM.

  7. #17
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    yes i recommend deadlifts from a riser in the preparatory period.. closing to a comp i recommend to ditch any slow pulls

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leeland View Post
    Im fairly new to weightlifting training but I do have a 320kg flat back deadlift from training for powerlifting. Do you guys think it will be more of a hinderance than advantage when trying to become decent at the lifts?
    While it shows you have a good strength potential, i've found massive surplusses ov strength are more ov a hindrance, actually. The biggest reason is expectation. That alone can kill your whole effort dead. Then there are the imbalances most powerlifters have from pulling a certain way. Shit... i compete in powerlifting, but with a clean deadlift, and i STILL find it tightens me up too much for the lifts. Best thing you could possibly do is forget everything you know, forget what you can lift, and approach the weightlifting hall like a brand new lifter... One that just might happen to have a very good 'natural' strength. Heh... ask me how i know...

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sporting View Post
    You have to be retard level uncoordinated to not be able to at least power clean 50% of your deadlift. Within a few weeks to months of power cleaning most everyone can get to 50% of their best deadlift as long as deadlift does not = sumo with low ROM.
    Sorry... doesn't quite work that way. At lower levels perhaps, but for a 700 deadlifter, there are many different, many hidden things required to clean 160. No one scoffs at a 160 clean, and you're suggesting any idiot with a 700 deadlift could do it. My best clean was an absolute limit 157 and my (PL style conventional) pull was 300ish at the time. Now i can easily pull 320, and thats an olympic clean deadlift, and i'd be lucky to clean 135 right now. My form is even better, far better than it was when i did 157.

  10. #20
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    I'd program them, as a coach. An interesting thing i have seen many times is with other lifters, hitting a certain plateau with their squats... and they try everything under the sun to rectify this. I find they are usually not deadlifting, or if they are, not seriously enough. Deadlifts build total overall strength, and you cannot expect your squat to continue gaining without the big lifts. Much in the same way some guys like to only front squat, and never back squat, and then complain about unbreakable plateaus.

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