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Thread: Average Relative Intensities for a class II lifter

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    Average Relative Intensities for a class II lifter

    I have ARIs written down for each exercise group (sn, cl, sn pull, cl pull, jerk, and squat), for each training phase (prep, comp) except for the transition phase. I got these numbers from Medvedyev’s book. I would like to have the numbers for the transition phase because I am starting to think about planning a transition cycle. Does anyone know where I can find these in Medvedyev’s book? I can’t seem to locate any of the numbers in his book anymore, only tables for the yearly averages (which are not broken up into the traning phases).

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    I can appreciate you wanting to know average intensity in the transition phase. In short I’ve been there and done that. Pretty certain they don’t exist. But even if they did, IMO the exact numbers are unnecessary minutia. Its More about underlying philosophy and methodology than strict adherence to sets of numbers or blueprint intensities.

    Generally the transition will be both the lowest volume AND lowest intensity of the year.

    Themes that I typically follow
    3-4 sessions/week at most with wts, work within a 60-75 min limit
    Exercises are atypical (avoid what is routinely done throughout the year) It may be important what exercises are NOT included. I once included deadlifts with 2” strongman bar with a female. Bring relaxed fun back to training.
    I set a 65% max limit, with many exercises well below this intensity
    Sets tend to be low and reps high

    The literature
    Length of the period usually 1-4 wks depending (classification level and circumstances and competitions in the training year)
    After a competition macrocycle none- 1 wk
    At year end with a major competition 1-4 wks
    After the Olympics 4-8 wks???? I don’t think many of us should be concerned

    Why a transition??
    Physical and psychological restoration; Recuperation. Come out of the transition feeling fresh and rejuvenated ready to again enthusiastically embrace hard training. I like to think of the transition as a reset. A very critical component is to Importantly EVALUATE the work to date that has been done, and and using this info to formulate the start of a new plan forward. I think of the transition as the start of a new macrocycle. A lifter must be ready with certainty to handle the extensive prep cycle which may well have BOTH highest volume and intensity (due to the volume of squats and pulls). So we need fresh adrenal/hormonal systems and fresh nervous system both CNS and PNS (autonomic).

    Lifters who have coaches are at an advantage as it is the coach who objectively and subjectively evaluates the necessity of length and intensities. The same lifter can compete successfully in competitions and come out one competition ready for more or pretty beaten up. It always a judgement call as to length of the transition and what is done within.

    An advanced lifter with 2 major peaks/year may need a very small transition(or none) after the 1st less important peak and a longer length one after the major end of year primary peak.

    Problems with extended transition periods. ie. Detraining (strength) and loss of technical skills esp in beginners and intermed lifters.

    Other viewpoints on transition
    Carl miller(USA) former national coach calls the transition a re-adaptation phase
    His methodology
    50-60% wts 4-6 reps with as many sets as possible within an allocated time (1 min rest interval)
    OR
    40-50% wts 4-6 reps going from exercise to exercise ( no rest interval)

    GDR (East Germany)short active and above all psychological recovery. Particularly essential when the major competition occurs late in a demanding year. The means are general training, other sports, physiotherapy
    Load; mediocre with low intensity

    Synopsis of transition phase at end of a macrocycle or end of year (Urso-Italy)
    Goal; general recovery
    Duration; 1-4 wks
    Exercise; general str and squat. Few technical exercises.
    Intensity; low 50-70%
    Volume; very low

    I have seen many elite lifters at the worlds back in the training hall the day after they have lifted doing the “ full tilt boggie” ie. The process by which someone acts in an extremely focused and aggressive manner in the pursuit of a goal. Zero apparent transition.

    Medveyev 1979 on transition (intensities numbers are nowhere to be found)
    For members of Soviet team; 2 variants
    1.Sessions with non-stress loads including BB exercises and other forms of resistance in combination with exercises from other sports
    2.Sessions that exclude bb exercises
    Survey Of Soviet coaches re: active rest (transition)
    93% felt a rest from training was necessary
    81% advocate active rest with a non stressful load
    13% recommend that dumbbell exercises be included
    Survey of the lifters
    81% of highly qualified lifters advocate the necessity of a rest
    78% replied they rest (active) 1 month a year
    The soviet team
    15-40 days/yr BUT with some no rest (15% )

    So specific numbers in the transition would be practicing the Folly Of Fools. IMO.

    Stellar advice from a friend of mine, the late Jim O’Malley. “The importance of correctly programming one’s training cannot be overemphasized. Many times training advice is offered that is quantitative, very specific, and most often takes a short term approach. As a result, one is often presented with a “one size fits all” training regime that yields at best temporary gains and at worst leads to a fall in the standard of progress.”
    Last edited by robo; 05-31-2018 at 05:55 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by robo View Post
    I can appreciate you wanting to know average intensity in the transition phase. In short I’ve been there and done that. Pretty certain they don’t exist. But even if they did, IMO the exact numbers are unnecessary minutia. Its More about underlying philosophy and methodology than strict adherence to sets of numbers or blueprint intensities.

    Generally the transition will be both the lowest volume AND lowest intensity of the year.

    Themes that I typically follow
    3-4 sessions/week at most with wts, work within a 60-75 min limit
    Exercises are atypical (avoid what is routinely done throughout the year) It may be important what exercises are NOT included. I once included deadlifts with 2” strongman bar with a female. Bring relaxed fun back to training.
    I set a 65% max limit, with many exercises well below this intensity
    Sets tend to be low and reps high

    The literature
    Length of the period usually 1-4 wks depending (classification level and circumstances and competitions in the training year)
    After a competition macrocycle none- 1 wk
    At year end with a major competition 1-4 wks
    After the Olympics 4-8 wks???? I don’t think many of us should be concerned

    Why a transition??
    Physical and psychological restoration; Recuperation. Come out of the transition feeling fresh and rejuvenated ready to again enthusiastically embrace hard training. I like to think of the transition as a reset. A very critical component is to Importantly EVALUATE the work to date that has been done, and and using this info to formulate the start of a new plan forward. I think of the transition as the start of a new macrocycle. A lifter must be ready with certainty to handle the extensive prep cycle which may well have BOTH highest volume and intensity (due to the volume of squats and pulls). So we need fresh adrenal/hormonal systems and fresh nervous system both CNS and PNS (autonomic).

    Lifters who have coaches are at an advantage as it is the coach who objectively and subjectively evaluates the necessity of length and intensities. The same lifter can compete successfully in competitions and come out one competition ready for more or pretty beaten up. It always a judgement call as to length of the transition and what is done within.

    An advanced lifter with 2 major peaks/year may need a very small transition(or none) after the 1st less important peak and a longer length one after the major end of year primary peak.

    Problems with extended transition periods. ie. Detraining (strength) and loss of technical skills esp in beginners and intermed lifters.

    Other viewpoints on transition
    Carl miller(USA) former national coach calls the transition a re-adaptation phase
    His methodology
    50-60% wts 4-6 reps with as many sets as possible within an allocated time (1 min rest interval)
    OR
    40-50% wts 4-6 reps going from exercise to exercise ( no rest interval)

    GDR (East Germany)short active and above all psychological recovery. Particularly essential when the major competition occurs late in a demanding year. The means are general training, other sports, physiotherapy
    Load; mediocre with low intensity

    Synopsis of transition phase at end of a macrocycle or end of year (Urso-Italy)
    Goal; general recovery
    Duration; 1-4 wks
    Exercise; general str and squat. Few technical exercises.
    Intensity; low 50-70%
    Volume; very low

    I have seen many elite lifters at the worlds back in the training hall the day after they have lifted doing the “ full tilt boggie” ie. The process by which someone acts in an extremely focused and aggressive manner in the pursuit of a goal. Zero apparent transition.

    Medveyev 1979 on transition (intensities numbers are nowhere to be found)
    For members of Soviet team; 2 variants
    1.Sessions with non-stress loads including BB exercises and other forms of resistance in combination with exercises from other sports
    2.Sessions that exclude bb exercises
    Survey Of Soviet coaches re: active rest (transition)
    93% felt a rest from training was necessary
    81% advocate active rest with a non stressful load
    13% recommend that dumbbell exercises be included
    Survey of the lifters
    81% of highly qualified lifters advocate the necessity of a rest
    78% replied they rest (active) 1 month a year
    The soviet team
    15-40 days/yr BUT with some no rest (15% )

    So specific numbers in the transition would be practicing the Folly Of Fools. IMO.

    Stellar advice from a friend of mine, the late Jim O’Malley. “The importance of correctly programming one’s training cannot be overemphasized. Many times training advice is offered that is quantitative, very specific, and most often takes a short term approach. As a result, one is often presented with a “one size fits all” training regime that yields at best temporary gains and at worst leads to a fall in the standard of progress.”
    Thank you! This is going to take me some time to digest.

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