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Thread: 30 days pre-contest

  1. #1
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    30 days pre-contest

    30 days pre-contest

    I have some weaknesses, but I would like to beat at least 105% of my PRs.

    I´ve reached those PRs only in dec´17 and not anymore due to some health problems (not because of how hard they are).

    My intention is to focus on single/doubles at 70-85% and, at some point between today and the contest, I am interested to beat the current PRs.

    No techniques, no strenght exercises, only singles/doubles.

    What do you guys think about?

  2. #2
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    Its hard (and probably unwise) to advise someone you don't know anything about, so I'll just say what I would do. It may not be appropriate for you.

    With respect to goal setting, I would set my goal to improve my best PR by one kilo for each lift (my total is about as good as I'm ever going to get). You always want to do your best and little steps will work best, well assuming you aren't going to be on the podium for the nationals. Patience in life is a virtue.

    I would concentrate on singles (excepting light weights) and as many lifts 90%+ as my body can take. No pulls. Not too heavy on the squats. Last heavy clean and jerk 10-11 days out. Last heavy snatch one week out. Both of these days lifts should be absolute maximum, ideally either equaled or new PRs.

    My approach is pretty much standard competition phase training.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Echternacht View Post
    Its hard (and probably unwise) to advise someone you don't know anything about, so I'll just say what I would do. It may not be appropriate for you.

    With respect to goal setting, I would set my goal to improve my best PR by one kilo for each lift (my total is about as good as I'm ever going to get). You always want to do your best and little steps will work best, well assuming you aren't going to be on the podium for the nationals. Patience in life is a virtue.

    I would concentrate on singles (excepting light weights) and as many lifts 90%+ as my body can take. No pulls. Not too heavy on the squats. Last heavy clean and jerk 10-11 days out. Last heavy snatch one week out. Both of these days lifts should be absolute maximum, ideally either equaled or new PRs.

    My approach is pretty much standard competition phase training.
    Gary, if I may, how old are you? How long have you been lifting? I've been active my whole life (even managed to letter in D1 football), but I didn't really get into weightlifting until a few years ago (I'm 36 now), and I've been wondering how much longer I can expect to lift and to set PRs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Echternacht View Post
    Its hard (and probably unwise) to advise someone you don't know anything about, so I'll just say what I would do. It may not be appropriate for you.

    With respect to goal setting, I would set my goal to improve my best PR by one kilo for each lift (my total is about as good as I'm ever going to get). You always want to do your best and little steps will work best, well assuming you aren't going to be on the podium for the nationals. Patience in life is a virtue.

    I would concentrate on singles (excepting light weights) and as many lifts 90%+ as my body can take. No pulls. Not too heavy on the squats. Last heavy clean and jerk 10-11 days out. Last heavy snatch one week out. Both of these days lifts should be absolute maximum, ideally either equaled or new PRs.

    My approach is pretty much standard competition phase training.
    Thank you Gary

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    This summer I turn 74.

    I started competing when I was 21 and retired when I was 32. Took about a year and a half off between those years for injury. Competed in the 82.5, 90, and 110 weight classes. Never weighed more than 100 kg, however. After retiring, ran three marathons, raced a bike, and coached some high school throwers. After that I came back to weightlifting for a couple of years. Competed in the 90 kg class. Only did that for a 2 or 3 years, I can't remember. Quit at age 50. The meets were bad, though I was good for my age, I couldn't adjust my mind to account for older age, hurt my knee, and was depressed about the whole matter. Decided that I needed to do something new. Took up dance, which I've done for 24 years. Dancers always want to lose weight and at the ripe old age of 69 decided to go back to weightlifting as a way to lose a pound or two. Worked like a charm. Lost weight and fat and gained a lot of muscle.

    Don't compete any longer. I just like to train for training sake. I do regular "big Fridays" that act as my meets. PRs are good for my age and weight (now at 76 kg). Did my last snatch PR and clean and jerk PR about 2 years ago. Last big Friday was disappointing as I made only my starting snatch (a weight I never miss) and missed my hopeful clean and jerk, which was less than my PR. Since then I've been doing only maintenance training as I want to evaluate my goals.

    I am terrible at adjusting my performance to account for age. Were it not for the existence of kilo bumper plates, I don't think I would be lifting. I know adjusted for age my lifts are really good. But my God, when i translate those numbers into pounds, I realize I stink.

    I much admire guys like Fred Lowe who have stayed with it for so long. I wish I could do it. But it's just not part of my personality.

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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by brownbear1968 View Post
    30 days pre-contest

    I have some weaknesses, but I would like to beat at least 105% of my PRs.

    I´ve reached those PRs only in dec´17 and not anymore due to some health problems (not because of how hard they are).

    My intention is to focus on single/doubles at 70-85% and, at some point between today and the contest, I am interested to beat the current PRs.

    No techniques, no strenght exercises, only singles/doubles.

    What do you guys think about?
    I don't mean to pry, but were/are the health problems in any way related to supplements you were taking, or perhaps lifestyle leading up to the point of said PRs? You've already inferred it's not due to the lifting itself, so that's ruled out.

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    Tommy Kono would only focus on technique when he had little time to prepare for a competition.
    If you snatch 20 times the last one should be the best. That sort of thing. Some pulls and squats can still be useful, but not very heavy so that it does not alter your technique.
    A few heavy sets of squats might stimulate the CNS positively.

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  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Echternacht View Post
    This summer I turn 74.

    I started competing when I was 21 and retired when I was 32. Took about a year and a half off between those years for injury. Competed in the 82.5, 90, and 110 weight classes. Never weighed more than 100 kg, however. After retiring, ran three marathons, raced a bike, and coached some high school throwers. After that I came back to weightlifting for a couple of years. Competed in the 90 kg class. Only did that for a 2 or 3 years, I can't remember. Quit at age 50. The meets were bad, though I was good for my age, I couldn't adjust my mind to account for older age, hurt my knee, and was depressed about the whole matter. Decided that I needed to do something new. Took up dance, which I've done for 24 years. Dancers always want to lose weight and at the ripe old age of 69 decided to go back to weightlifting as a way to lose a pound or two. Worked like a charm. Lost weight and fat and gained a lot of muscle.

    Don't compete any longer. I just like to train for training sake. I do regular "big Fridays" that act as my meets. PRs are good for my age and weight (now at 76 kg). Did my last snatch PR and clean and jerk PR about 2 years ago. Last big Friday was disappointing as I made only my starting snatch (a weight I never miss) and missed my hopeful clean and jerk, which was less than my PR. Since then I've been doing only maintenance training as I want to evaluate my goals.

    I am terrible at adjusting my performance to account for age. Were it not for the existence of kilo bumper plates, I don't think I would be lifting. I know adjusted for age my lifts are really good. But my God, when i translate those numbers into pounds, I realize I stink.

    I much admire guys like Fred Lowe who have stayed with it for so long. I wish I could do it. But it's just not part of my personality.
    Damn! Wow, great to hear you're still doing the lifts. I hope to still be as active as you when I get to that age. That's truly awesome!

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon Kaz View Post
    Tommy Kono would only focus on technique when he had little time to prepare for a competition.
    If you snatch 20 times the last one should be the best. That sort of thing. Some pulls and squats can still be useful, but not very heavy so that it does not alter your technique.
    A few heavy sets of squats might stimulate the CNS positively.
    Tested or untested federation tho? I'm not familiar with the history of that era

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiamondCrusader View Post
    Tested or untested federation tho? I'm not familiar with the history of that era
    Neither, most evidence suggests American lifters starting using D-Bol in the early 1960s. There's some limited evidence the Soviets used testosterone in the mid-1950s, but it comes from an unreliable source.

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