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Thread: Response to IOC by IWF

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by FFF View Post
    I used to think the same thing but I no longer agree with this. While the public at large still sees the Olympics as a coveted event, it's really nothing more than a schill organization used to suck revenue out of spectators. The true essence of amateur competition is completely gone, and the IOC ranks, imo as one of the most corrupt sporting organizations in the world.
    Yeah this. The whole concept of the olympics has lost a lot of value to me as well.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by FFF View Post
    I used to think the same thing but I no longer agree with this. While the public at large still sees the Olympics as a coveted event, it's really nothing more than a schill organization used to suck revenue out of spectators. The true essence of amateur competition is completely gone, and the IOC ranks, imo as one of the most corrupt sporting organizations in the world.
    "Amateur competition" disappeared quite some time ago, and I have no problem with that. Also, while I align with the view of the IOC as a corrupt organization and the Olympics as a dicey sporting exhibition, one does have to remember that the PUBLIC AT LARGE (and most governments and national sports governing bodies at large) see the Olympics as a coveted event and a way to demonstrate, "on a field of play", the success & superiority of their nation and people. The governments and national sports bodies of China, Kazakhstan, Russia, etc., etc. put money into weightlifting (not just for drugs, but for facilities, recruitment, training) because they have found that this funding puts "their" teams on the podium to "show off" the nation to the world on the big stage. If you take weightlifting out of the Olympics, it will largely disappear from these nations because the national sports bodies will have no desire to fund the local WL federation. . . not a bad thing, you say; one that would eliminate these problematic PED nations from the international field of play? Well, without the carrot of Olympic participation, one would also lose the stick of banning a federation from Olympic participation, with a federation ban from an Olympics being the most direct threat to the pocketbooks of a corrupt national federation lead. . . it is the most direct threat to the funding they get from their national sports body BECAUSE their WL team is in the Olympics. Furthermore, in removing WL from IOC affiliation, (a) many other "non-PED-heavy" national WL federations would also lose significant funding, (b) the breadth & depth of international competition (not just the obscenely-high numbers) would likely disappear, and (c) ability to get youth to commit focus to the sport in almost all nations would also fall.

    It might seem contradictory to my thoughts above, but I believe that if the Olympics just disappear on their own then WL will be better for it. . . perhaps much more so than other Olympic sports like swimming or T&F. When NO sports have the every-4-year glamour-fest of the Olympics, I believe that the lesser-known sports benefit disproportionately (or, perhaps, suffer much less than their more-popular brethren). However, for now, the Olympics appear to be hanging around, so WL (the IWF) should proceed thusly.

  3. #13
    Here comes the 'Weightlifting Quadrennial Games; sponsored by Coke.' (or maybe McDonalds now that they pulled out of sponsoring the IOC)

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by FFF View Post
    I used to think the same thing but I no longer agree with this. While the public at large still sees the Olympics as a coveted event, it's really nothing more than a schill organization used to suck revenue out of spectators. The true essence of amateur competition is completely gone, and the IOC ranks, imo as one of the most corrupt sporting organizations in the world.
    Unfortunately, I cannot argue with any of this. The Olympics has pretty much turned into an event which, if there was no TV, would not exist. The money spent by countries hosting the games is ridiculous and, for the most part, venues simply deteriorate after the production is over. Meanwhile, the host country gets the massive debt as a reminder. Its time has come and gone.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by DylanJM View Post
    What would that achieve? The IWF would essentially be voluntarily removing itself from the Olympics. WL losing its place in the Olympics is the worst thing that could happen to the sport.
    It would be interesting to know whether the money "wasted" (my term) on doping controls (and through revenue lost through adverse publicity) would be better spent on actually growing the sport.

    My somewhat-educated guess is that - in the long term - WL would be better off driving it's own development in a much more direct manner than hanging onto the Coat Tails of the Olympic Movement and the current inexplicable love for WADA...in 20 years when most people are on TRT I think we'll be looking back with some befuddlement at this period.

  6. #16
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    That's great news Phil. Thanks as always.

    Quote Originally Posted by PhilAndrews View Post
    Ryan, I am currently returning from the IWF Congress and meetings in Tokyo.

    The EB, then ratified by Congress, brought together a working group of experts in the field. The headline one they need to finalize a contract with before announcing, though I can confirm that they are an absolute top expert in Anti-Doping. They did the same on the sport structure (weight categories etc.), again with some excellent names in the room.

    Those people will then report back to an extraordinary board meeting with recommendations.

    The EB as a whole, led by Dr Tamas Ajan, made it clear they are going the route of banning Federations (via due legal process), and even went to the length to say they do not need 192 nations in the Federation, and will eliminate nations totally if they must.

    Having spent a great deal of time with the EB members in the last few days, it is clear there is a will and an understanding of the critical nature of reform.

    I will add a personal word - if we are going to eradicate doping from Weightlifting, it will entail positives. The USA is a great example of that, we test USA Weightlifting more than almost any other sport in any other nation on the planet (almost 100 controls per month so far!), and we get a fair share of positives from that.

  7. #17
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    The paradox, though, is that progress, at least early on, should be correlated with the number of positive tests. But I would assume that is the opposite of what the IOC thinks. I mean that's how we got into this situation. A large number of positives. So how should the IOC measure progress?

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanwtyler View Post
    The paradox, though, is that progress, at least early on, should be correlated with the number of positive tests. But I would assume that is the opposite of what the IOC thinks. I mean that's how we got into this situation. A large number of positives. So how should the IOC measure progress?
    I'm not sure how they should, but I think they measure progress by a lack of positive results, which in their mind would mean lifters are drug free.

    I think their intent of a strict testing program is to decrease drug utilization. If a lot are being caught, it is not working.

    My son won his first junior nationals at age 13, I believe the weight class was 45 or 46 (as they added a couple of lighter classes for those under 16). He was drug tested at the meet and went into a the NAN pool. I thought is was a ridiculous waste of resources ($), testing a 13 y/o, under 100 pounds? But, I also looked at it as sending a message, and at an early age, that you just cannot do this and compete in this sport.

    I think you are right in that more positives can be tolerated early on, but later that number needs to decrease. The problem is why is it decreasing (if it does)? Are fewer lifters using banned substances, or are more finding ways around the testing, at least until it catches up like what has happened with the '08 and '12 Games?

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris McCarthy View Post
    It would be interesting to know whether the money "wasted" (my term) on doping controls (and through revenue lost through adverse publicity) would be better spent on actually growing the sport.

    My somewhat-educated guess is that - in the long term - WL would be better off driving it's own development in a much more direct manner than hanging onto the Coat Tails of the Olympic Movement and the current inexplicable love for WADA...in 20 years when most people are on TRT I think we'll be looking back with some befuddlement at this period.
    Things would get really nasty quickly if there wasnt any drug testing being done. There would be no hiding the issues that would arise.

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