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Thread: 4 Week Experimental Program

  1. #41
    Member Judas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PVCPipe View Post
    How would this be modified without an ability to time a squat?
    I've been doing '1-second' (concentric) lifts for a while now. Trying to build my explosive power for a new direction in training. I use it on some other lifters too. I have a pretty mechanical mind when it comes to eyeballing, or timing stuff, and i find it pretty easy. We always have analog clocks handy too. I do tend to pause those lifts though, at the bottom, even if just long enough to break the reflex. You can also use video too. I have a second set ov 'PR's for these lifts, and if i judge it too slow, i dont count it. Its a 'missed' lift. I can note this in my log, because obviously anything i'm going to attempt to lift in one second or less i will never actually miss. Its a great confidence builder too, takes the 'fear' some people have right out ov the lift, as even though they know they might 'miss' the second (and the PR), they'll still know they will always get the lift back up.

    One other strange note... when i switched from normal 'slow' (typically 1-1.5 seconds concentric for me, my 'grinders' are never more than 2 seconds), to this faster style, i noticed my injuries and tweaks started to go away. Despite the violence ov the speed, it seemed that time under tension, even if it was just one extra second, seemed to be doing more damage than anything else. To me at least, that seems counter-intuitive, but yet, there it is. No other changes were made. This has happened twice now, in two separate blocks.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judas View Post
    I've been doing '1-second' (concentric) lifts for a while now. Trying to build my explosive power for a new direction in training. I use it on some other lifters too. I have a pretty mechanical mind when it comes to eyeballing, or timing stuff, and i find it pretty easy. We always have analog clocks handy too. I do tend to pause those lifts though, at the bottom, even if just long enough to break the reflex. You can also use video too. I have a second set ov 'PR's for these lifts, and if i judge it too slow, i dont count it. Its a 'missed' lift. I can note this in my log, because obviously anything i'm going to attempt to lift in one second or less i will never actually miss. Its a great confidence builder too, takes the 'fear' some people have right out ov the lift, as even though they know they might 'miss' the second (and the PR), they'll still know they will always get the lift back up.

    One other strange note... when i switched from normal 'slow' (typically 1-1.5 seconds concentric for me, my 'grinders' are never more than 2 seconds), to this faster style, i noticed my injuries and tweaks started to go away. Despite the violence ov the speed, it seemed that time under tension, even if it was just one extra second, seemed to be doing more damage than anything else. To me at least, that seems counter-intuitive, but yet, there it is. No other changes were made. This has happened twice now, in two separate blocks.
    How’s your tendinitis?

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by nkklllll View Post
    How’s your tendinitis?
    Haven't felt the knee in over a year, and even then (last Nov i think?) it was under a near-PR triple squat. I still wrap my patellar religiously though, with a little physio band. Not sure if it even helps at this point, or if i need it. The elbow? Comes and goes. I cant train arms much anymore, but luckily thats far from a weakness. I tweaked it again just recently, pressing out a little-too-low snatch, ov all things... My 4th snatch workout in a year and a half. Figures. I've since developed other issues. Got some weird glute thing thats stressing out my lower back and causing pain where there is nothing wrong. Haven't been able to pull since last November. Another fucking mystery that no one will be able to diagnose. Sometimes i just wish something big and important would just snap... and then there will be NO debating whats wrong... and maybe it could even get fixed.

  4. #44
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    Well I finished today, happy with the program but not happy with my performance. I feel I should've maxed out my snatch the week before because I was feeling it but today I just sucked. I hit my old snatch max but couldn't lock out anything heavier. Hit 3kg above my old CJ max and failed the jerk attempting a 7kg pr but I definitely had it in me. Lastly hit a 8kg pr on backsquat with the tempo.

    I don't know what feedback you're looking for in particular about the program, anything you want to know specifically and I'll talk about it. I enjoyed how simplistic it was, I enjoy tempo squats, and I like programs that program one heavy-ish day a week because too many programs turn away and do pure volume. I 100% did not follow any perscribed rest breaks nor did I follow the accessories you planned as I already have an established accessory schedule that works for my injuries/body.

    Overall I enjoyed the program and I'll be running it again starting next week. I will be making three changes: power jerks instead of BNJ(which I was already doing cause I cant do BNJ), instead of 2 hangs I'll do a power+hang because my extension needs work, and lastly I'll be doing front squats on the 5th day instead of backsquats because I want some moe front squat focus.

  5. #45
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    I’ve just finished the first week, and like it so far. Has anyone else felt that this has been really heavy? It’s week 1 and I’m not sure how much heavier I’m going to be able to go, even if a few sets get dropped.

    I’m tracking my progress in the training log below. I’ve included my personal manipulations in the first post. I also have been linking some video highlights of the sessions.

    http://wlforums.com/forums/showthrea...2089#post62089

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Griz31 View Post
    I’ve just finished the first week, and like it so far. Has anyone else felt that this has been really heavy? It’s week 1 and I’m not sure how much heavier I’m going to be able to go, even if a few sets get dropped.

    I’m tracking my progress in the training log below. I’ve included my personal manipulations in the first post. I also have been linking some video highlights of the sessions.

    http://wlforums.com/forums/showthrea...2089#post62089
    Yeah if you went with "true" maxes this is gonna be a ballbusting program. It's definitely better with a few kilos dropped off each lift.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by FFF View Post
    I actually got the idea from Jim Napier's books. I think mostly the books aren't that great, but just as no one is right about everything, it's unlikely someone is wrong about everything. If I read a book and can take away even one bit of information I didn't have before, I think it's worth it. Jim wants everything to be timed, squats, pulls, the lifts themselves, which I think is overkill, but I like the concept, and squats are easy to apply this metric to. He also recommends squats at 1 second or less, which I think is a bit extreme.

    Ironically, "speed work" is something used a lot in certain powerlifting circles, and I think it works. Most people wouldn't think of a squat a speed exercise, but I've noticed that not that when I tell my athletes to try to move fast in the ascent in the squat, they actually can move a lot faster than they would when they simply try to "stand up." It also helps to limit ugly out of position grinding reps, which I don't think really do anything for you anyway.
    I first came across this idea in the 1990s when I read this book by Fred Hatfield. Though I am sure that the idea predated him.

    Some of the ideas in the book have become dated by modern standards but it introduced me to what Fred called "compensatory acceleration". This was his concept that every sub-maximal rep should be performed with the intention of producing on maximal speed through the concentric phase (with a small taper at the end of the movement to retain control of the barbell). The purpose of focusing on the barbell speed was to:

    1. Increase the athlete's power output;
    2. Increase neuro-muscular recruitment;
    3. Reduce joint fatigue by minimising time under tension,
    4. Improve the chances of the athlete moving through the sticking points of the movement at maximal loading.

    I've tried to incorporate this idea into my training whenever it makes sense to do so and I am prepared to deload whenever movements begin to grind. However I use qualitative assessment rather than a stop-watch to rate my movement (since I often train on my own alone). A coach I respect once told me that his coaching philosophy was "training not straining" and I think that's a good way of communicating the idea.

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