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Thread: APRE Method

  1. #1
    AKA Tony Arkitect FFF's Avatar
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    APRE Method

    Sharing this article I did on APRE training. Been using it with a lot of clients with great success. Works in well with high volume/hypertrophy phases of Weightlifting training for those trying to gain some more size or work capacity.



    http://arkitectfitness.com/use-apre-training/

    Would love to hear your thoughts on the write up.

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    I like it, maybe more for the higher rep protocol than the 3s. Guarantees two hard sets. I'm thinking one may need/prefer more sets working up to a 3RM. Maybe not.

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    AKA Tony Arkitect FFF's Avatar
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    I will say I've definitely found clients getting the most gains out of the 10 and 6 protocol. The 3 is hit or miss depending on the athlete.

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    Member jockomoron's Avatar
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    Is this something you would push once, twice, or three times a week? Did you run this concurrently with other exercises too? Did you notice any differences between athletes that had current 10RMs vs. those that did not?

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    I'm a college strength coach and I used this with a group of swimmers this summer. Worked well for most of them. Had athletes repping their DL maxes for 10 in a few weeks. Some added 85 lbs to their max over the summer. I think it worked well for swimmers because they tend to do better with volume. We progressed from the 10s to the 6s to the 3s then did 1RM over the course of 10-12 weeks. I used it on Squat/Bench/Deadlift. Seemed to work much better on Squat and Deadlift for them.

    I used it over the course of 5 weeks this fall with my Women's Basketball team for Bench Press. Worked well for them. Consistent 5-15 lb increases on their max. I did two weeks of the 6 protocol and 3 weeks of the 3s, then hit 1RMs. I'll take those improvements after doing max strength work all summer then adding the APRE in the fall.
    120/137 @105+, too tall

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    AKA Tony Arkitect FFF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jockomoron View Post
    Is this something you would push once, twice, or three times a week? Did you run this concurrently with other exercises too? Did you notice any differences between athletes that had current 10RMs vs. those that did not?
    So usually we just replace the strength work sets/reps with this. So for example, if you would normally do a 3x10 of squats, we'd sub in an APRE 10RM for squats. With that said, I rarely program squatting the same way more than once a week. Usually we do on session of back squats, one of front squats. If you were going to squat more than twice a week, I don't' think this would be appropriate because the volume and frequency would be too high.

    Regarding your last question, off the top of my head I want to say "no" but I guess that's a factor I wasn't really monitoring too much.

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  9. #7
    AKA Tony Arkitect FFF's Avatar
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    Finally got around to making a video on how this method works.


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    It's an interesting idea - but I'm inherently sceptical of any training system that involves working to failure with heavy loads.

    In my experience, when an athlete is doing lengthy sets the smaller muscles and muscle groups that support the joints will generally fatigue before the larger muscles and muscle groups. This causes the body to redistribute load away from the fatigued parts, and this redistribution can result in overload injuries.

    I have no doubt that your training system is producing results. But I'd be concerned about the potential for injury and the corresponding consequences for athlete longevity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleddau View Post
    It's an interesting idea - but I'm inherently sceptical of any training system that involves working to failure with heavy loads.

    In my experience, when an athlete is doing lengthy sets the smaller muscles and muscle groups that support the joints will generally fatigue before the larger muscles and muscle groups. This causes the body to redistribute load away from the fatigued parts, and this redistribution can result in overload injuries.

    I have no doubt that your training system is producing results. But I'd be concerned about the potential for injury and the corresponding consequences for athlete longevity.
    The volume is overall pretty low, and you should shut the set down before total failure, muscular or technique. Also if the rest of the program is designed intelligently, it's not really an issue. With that said, I don't think it's ideal for elite lifters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FFF View Post
    The volume is overall pretty low, and you should shut the set down before total failure, muscular or technique. Also if the rest of the program is designed intelligently, it's not really an issue. With that said, I don't think it's ideal for elite lifters.
    I get that.

    It's not a criticism of your program - it's just an observation that auto-regulation requires some genuine skill, understanding, and awareness in order to be done safely.

    The biggest risk I see with auto-regulation is the athlete mindset that results will only come from constantly and relentlessly pushing themselves.

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