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Thread: Definition: Competitive Weightlifter

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    Definition: Competitive Weightlifter

    Hey guys, some of you may know that I'm a grad student working on my research project right now and some of you may not an all of you just may not care. It directly deals with the weightlifting population so once it's closer to being completed I will be posting here hoping I can get people interested in taking the survey I'll be creating and if not passing it along to people who will.

    Right now one thing I'm struggling with is defining a competitive weightlifter as that is the population I'm working with. To get as many participants as possible I've been thinking about "Has atleast done at least one official competition and participated in the sport for atleast 6 months". I just wanted to come here and see if there are any opinions on what makes a competitive weightlifter. I do wanna clarify that I am not asking about what makes a weightlifter competitive, or good, or how many competitions are needed till they earned their place. I want your exclusion/inclusion criteria for a weightlifter.

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    I would say a weightlifter, by definition, is someone that competes in the sport of weightlifting. A powerlifter competes in powerlifting, and a bodybuilder competes in bodybuilding. There are those that lift weights, body build and power lift, but if they do not compete, they are not weightlifters, powerlifters or bodybuilders. Maybe they are best described as weight trainees.

    If you are not training for a specific competition, or with the intention of competing, then you are none of the above.

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    Meh... i think the people that get riled up over these distinctions are the same ones that insist on 1400 different genre's for a certain style ov music. If i devote my days to bodybuilding, you can call me a bodybuilder, same with weightlifting, or anything. I considered myself a powerlifter for years before i ever competed, and why not? I was ten times more dedicated than the dedicated ones on the platform, and a hundred times more than the dillettents that had done one or two meets here and there. I was also very involved in the sport, in many ways. Saying i wasn't a powerlifter (back then) was just trying to pick a fight. I would have loved, at any point, to call myself a weightlifter... but i just couldn't. Injuries and other issues just never seemed to let me get out ov first gear.

    Now... a 'competitive' _______, well, that ones fairly obvious. Compete, and at least somewhat regularly, barring any obvious issues (not lame excuses) that might keep you from doing so. I'm still a competitive powerlifter. I'd MUCH rather be a competitive weightlifter, or thrower... but sadly at this point, i just cant call myself that.

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    Oh yeah I don't wanna open the can of worms on who gets to call themselves a weightlifter. But since my project deals with how "lets call its variable one" effects performance I need to make a distinction for competitive weightlifters. So far it seems like you guys agree if needs to be someone who has competed but I might need to add in plans to compete in the future. So instead of "one competition and six months of experience" it should be "one competition six months of experience and a planned comp within a year barring injuries"

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    If you are American, you could define it as having competed at least once and is a current member of USAW. The membership would imply the intent to train for future competitions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Erdman View Post
    If you are American, you could define it as having competed at least once and is a current member of USAW. The membership would imply the intent to train for future competitions.
    Im currently in the UK and plan on pulling from as many people as possible (American, Canadian, UK, etc) so I don't want to limit it on membership. It's going to be an online survey which will allow massive participation. I can use "member of national sporting body" though.

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    I suppose people can call themselves whatever they want. I can call my eyes brown (they're blue). I'd be wrong.

    PVCPipe, since you're interested in doing research with a specific group, you set the parameters which are determined by what you are studying. If you are, let's say, studying the effects of the snatch and C&J on the knee, then it wouldn't matter if they compete or not, just that they did whatever volume necessary to qualify for your study.

    If you are looking at psychological factors that impact performance, then you'll need competition results to measure against training results. Maybe knowing what you are looking at would help, but it seems as though you want to include those that compete in weightlifting meets, or are training to do so. Good luck, looking forward to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wittmer View Post
    I suppose people can call themselves whatever they want. I can call my eyes brown (they're blue). I'd be wrong.

    PVCPipe, since you're interested in doing research with a specific group, you set the parameters which are determined by what you are studying. If you are, let's say, studying the effects of the snatch and C&J on the knee, then it wouldn't matter if they compete or not, just that they did whatever volume necessary to qualify for your study.

    If you are looking at psychological factors that impact performance, then you'll need competition results to measure against training results. Maybe knowing what you are looking at would help, but it seems as though you want to include those that compete in weightlifting meets, or are training to do so. Good luck, looking forward to it.
    Yeah definitely looking at psychological factors as I'm a Sport Psychology Msc. I'm not going ot be measuring training versus competition results but I will be compiling some competition results. I know they need at least one competition under their belt for this but if the community here had more stringent guidelines beyond one comp I wanted to hear it. This way when the data gets published its more palpable to the people who need it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Judas View Post
    Meh... i think the people that get riled up over these distinctions are the same ones that insist on 1400 different genre's for a certain style ov music.
    And here I thought you were a fan of extreme blackened technical death metal.

    Quote Originally Posted by PVCPipe View Post
    I know they need at least one competition under their belt for this but if the community here had more stringent guidelines beyond one comp I wanted to hear it.
    Six months seems pretty short to me, but it may be interesting to see the difference in mindset between people who haven't been competing as long (less than 2 or 3 years, maybe) and those who have been at it a lot longer (8-10 years and up, ish). The difference between people who hit that first big plateau and found a way/reason to keep going, and those who haven't hit that plateau yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheJonty View Post

    Six months seems pretty short to me, but it may be interesting to see the difference in mindset between people who haven't been competing as long (less than 2 or 3 years, maybe) and those who have been at it a lot longer (8-10 years and up, ish). The difference between people who hit that first big plateau and found a way/reason to keep going, and those who haven't hit that plateau yet.
    Yes the six months thing is so we can eventually compare those who have just started competing against those who have been at it for much longer. We assume experience is going to have an effect. I just six months because thats a fair amount of time to have prepared for your first competition, I didn't want to remove people who have competed(Especially after coming from a different sport) but I also didn't want a time so small to allow for anyone who jumped into a competition to be able to take part.

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