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Thread: How important is stretching?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie View Post
    Is there a way to tell if you actually need to stretch?
    Yes, as PVC mentioned, can you hit positions needed to successfully make the lift? If not, then you should determine why. Some lifters have extremely low bottom positions, some barely get below parallel. Lower is better, provided you can recover, because you do not need to get the bar as high to get under it. If your bottom position is limited due to muscular or soft tissue restrictions, then you might be able to do something to improve upon that. If it is due to articular restrictions, pelvic, hip and femur anthropometry, then you are stuck with your bone structure. In that case, forced stretching may be detrimental.

    It may take a knowledgeable coach, or someone trained in biomechanics, to determine what situation applies to you. In the case of the pelvis, x-ray and even CT can determine if hip anatomy is a problem for you. It may seem like a stretch, but other countries (Soviet Union, China, etc.) have used x-ray and limb measurements as part of their athlete selection process, for multiple sports, not just lifting.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PVCPipe View Post
    Can you hit the positions needed to execute the lifts easily and without much resistance? Then you don't need to stretch.
    Yes, I can now. However, I'm worried that over time I will lose my mobility/flexibility, causing me not to be able to hit the positions anymore. I'm also worried that I'm not maximizing my recovery, and I've heard that stretching is good for recovery (However, after reading Mike Wittmer's last post, I'm not so sure anymore).

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judas View Post
    Can you move like Aukhadov or Xiaojun Lu? No? Then stretch.
    I'm not so sure moving like them is the same as having their level of mobility/flexibility. But, I think you're saying that everyone should stretch.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wittmer View Post
    Yes, as PVC mentioned, can you hit positions needed to successfully make the lift? If not, then you should determine why. Some lifters have extremely low bottom positions, some barely get below parallel. Lower is better, provided you can recover, because you do not need to get the bar as high to get under it. If your bottom position is limited due to muscular or soft tissue restrictions, then you might be able to do something to improve upon that. If it is due to articular restrictions, pelvic, hip and femur anthropometry, then you are stuck with your bone structure. In that case, forced stretching may be detrimental.

    It may take a knowledgeable coach, or someone trained in biomechanics, to determine what situation applies to you. In the case of the pelvis, x-ray and even CT can determine if hip anatomy is a problem for you. It may seem like a stretch, but other countries (Soviet Union, China, etc.) have used x-ray and limb measurements as part of their athlete selection process, for multiple sports, not just lifting.
    Is there any risk to losing mobility/flexibility over time by training? You always hear about how lifting weights makes you immobile, but I'm assuming they're talking about bodybuilding/putting on mass and not training specific to weightlifting. Stated differently, will training keep your mobility/flexibility at your current level or should you stretch in order to make sure that you can still get as deep in the snatch as you currently can?

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie View Post
    Is there any risk to losing mobility/flexibility over time by training? You always hear about how lifting weights makes you immobile, but I'm assuming they're talking about bodybuilding/putting on mass and not training specific to weightlifting. Stated differently, will training keep your mobility/flexibility at your current level or should you stretch in order to make sure that you can still get as deep in the snatch as you currently can?
    Lifting weights makes you less mobile if the way you are lifting weights doesn't promote mobility. To give an example if you never squat to depth (quarter squat) your body will lose the mobility to sit in the hole comfortably. Weightlifting (snatch, clean and jerk) requires mobility from every major joint, and most muscle groups so if you conitnually hit those positions and hit those positions under loading you shouldnt lose mobility. Now if you aren't hitting them very well then you can develop imbalances and tightness because again you are lifting in a way that doesn't promote mobility. Your biggest concern should be your positions on the lifts and going from there.

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  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    Also "Relax into Stretch" by Pavel.
    Do you stick to the stretches in that book or do you do different/more stretches?

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie View Post
    Is there any risk to losing mobility/flexibility over time by training? You always hear about how lifting weights makes you immobile, but I'm assuming they're talking about bodybuilding/putting on mass and not training specific to weightlifting. Stated differently, will training keep your mobility/flexibility at your current level or should you stretch in order to make sure that you can still get as deep in the snatch as you currently can?
    I don't think so, provided you keep hitting proper positions and do not get injured, or gain a lot of weight, but that wouldn't be from training.

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