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Thread: "GPP" Recovery Days

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    "GPP" Recovery Days

    Inspired by Harrison Maurus' last few interviews and some reading I've been doing on programming. Harrison has been interviewed and said on his "recovery days" he does an assortment of non specific training but instead of it being light work he'll do something like very heavy farmer carries. I can't remember the loading as I'm writing this but for a 77kg lifter it was pretty monstrous. Now combining this with how I know sprinters, throwers, and general athletes training along with my reading of programming (eg over 12-16 weeks go from general programming to specific programming) I wanted to know people's opinion on GPP on recovery days even during specific training microcycles.

    Specifically the use of thing like jumping/sprinting/throwing. Since most programming for weightlifting seems to agree that jumps are good during the GPP phase but less so as you increase intensity and sport specification how would having a day of limited loading but high force impact training? I would like to clarify the day wouldn't be laid out intensely aka no depth jumps/shock drops/100m sprints/20lb sandbag tosses or whatever. Specifically a day of a few 20-40m sprints, some throws of a light dumbell/kettlebell, and/or a few bounding jumps or long jumps into a sandpit.

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    While the loading might seem monstrous for a 77/85, it probably isn't for someone who squats 250+ and CJ 200.

    OTOH, he's 17. Most of us on this forum are probably 25-40 besides a few over that who refuse to act their age. I'm sure Brian still remembers what it was like to train from 15-early 20s. I dealt with insomnia in HS and college but I still don't remember dragging ass in training whenever though of course, it's not like I was remotely impressive. Still I didn't worry about sleep, or the right macros or supplements, except maybe grabbing a nap when I could my sr year (last semester?) since I had the last period off and could go home and nap and get a snack before TnF. My supplements if anything were more food from what my friend's mom cooked or had to snack around.

    While I wasn't a FT WLer, my sr year I lifted every day M-F for 90minutes besides TnF for 2hrs M-F sometimes Sat when no meets. I generally did extra track work after TnF PV besides a long run on Saturdays. This wasn't much different than my frosh thru jr years when I was doing something like 15-25hrs a week of Karate with a lot of conditioning per our style. Something like 3-4hrs/day.

    Recovery is just so much better when you're a young guy. Even in college, I'd either lifts weights at school, go coach, then train for 2-3hrs afterwards or lift at WorldsGym for a few hrs at gymnastics maybe eating something when I went home. While my SNCJ were garbage, I was never sore at the gym and training was just meat and potatoes like HS centered around the barbell besides maybe some rows and legpress at the end.

    If I can, I'd like to go back to Adult Gymnastics on Monday nights though I'd prefer if I can get my training before in and use it as screw around time. I used to do it as just an off day and train WL 4x/week or go to WL then gymnastics which was alright. Shoulders might be a bit fatigued the next day but didn't seem to be too much of an issue.

    I suppose I could train afterwards but it ends at 9 which means late night training which kinda sucks and is a pain to plan nutrition for. Hmm, I do see that a farther gym has opengym on Saturday mornings which I could do if I got up before 930 and probably recover enough by the late afternoon or evening to do WL.

    The past two weeks I actually ended up doing 18.1 and 18.2 after MA on Thursday my off nights. It wasn't horrible and the rowing seemed alright. I've been meaning to do something on my off days of Th and Su as my old boss loved to condition and do a bunch of misc stuff with Chad Augustin on Sundays that seemed light CFitty.

    That something generally being cardio or boxing/kickboxing bagwork and shadowwork which I can do at home. Haven't really done either besides Traditional Japanese MA on Th which isn't that active for the most part besides occasionally being whacked or having to get taken to the ground over and over again.

    I suppose I could go in and do some GPP kinda stuff on Sundays like farmer carries, lunges though I do tend to enjoy doing nothing on Sundays instead. Hmm.

    When I was at Midtown in 2013-4, I used to do more GPP on Sat since fri was maxing out. Sled/prowler work and farmer walks generally ended the sessions after strength work.

    I used to do more jumps after squats but haven't in awhile since my right knee has been feeling wonky on some days. I'd been planning to for a few weeks before the competition phase.

    Something on the sprints, my buddys gym (CFbased but also WL and PL and SM) does them on the weekend but I don't think they actually work anything shorter than a 200. Longer distances possibly are less stressful on the body for injury less than 100m. Another buddy of mine likes to go do stairs on the weekend as unilateral work and so he does something more condition-ey. If I wasn't so lazy on Sundays, the HS track is only about 2mi away and my track shoes are in my garage.

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    I like the way Louie Simmons structures extra workouts: Bodybuildling stuff for lagging muscle groups, conditioning to raise work capacity and box jumps. And keeping the sessions short, under half an hour. Just stuff u neglect with your sport-specific training. I'd appreciate it if somebody would tell me to go to h$%# for mentioning Louie.

    Off topic but I'm not a big fan of throws? Unless your your sport requires you to move a light implement.
    Last edited by RigobertoXL; 03-12-2018 at 09:27 PM.

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    And keeping the sessions short, under half an hour.
    Personally I always thought that was with broscience of Abadjiev's with the spiking of T-levels and what not. I guess if it's just an extra workout that's assistance, it shouldn't be too long.

    I'm not a big fan of throws either. They are still the rage in S&C circles and all I see is ppl throwing medballs slowly with a partner to each other or at a wall. Overhead medballs may be legit but all this lobbing medballs seemed like BS to me. I remember one that I saw a lot is standing in front of a wall and throwing it laterally to one side.

    I think box jumps are another stupid human trick but they are fun. Verkhovshansky type of plyo's sure including depth and rebounding jumps or over obstacles or bb jumps, sure.

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    I remember reading in the early 1960s in Strength and Health magazine about the late great Waldemar Baszanowski's GPP training. It was essentially plyometrics-i.e., sprints, jumps, and throws. He did them in the off season. Back in the old USSR younger lifters did the same sort of thing. Since they were the weightlifting gods, I copied what they did. Loved doing them. Still do an abbreviated form.

    With respect to throws, one does have to throw hard just as you have to use heavy weights to get strong. It's the effort that counts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Echternacht View Post
    I remember reading in the early 1960s in Strength and Health magazine about the late great Waldemar Baszanowski's GPP training. It was essentially plyometrics-i.e., sprints, jumps, and throws. He did them in the off season. Back in the old USSR younger lifters did the same sort of thing. Since they were the weightlifting gods, I copied what they did. Loved doing them. Still do an abbreviated form.

    With respect to throws, one does have to throw hard just as you have to use heavy weights to get strong. It's the effort that counts.
    Yeah this is more in line with what I was talking about, not throwing med balls like some crossfit class. Just having a moderate-high effort track day with very very limited total volume as a recovery day. The work load will be short but because its explosive there would be extensive rest. I enjoy them more as a time to train outside and have fun and I feel the mix of vitamin D and using my body explosively(without weight) makes my body feel good.

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    I enjoy them more as a time to train outside and have fun
    I have a buddy who goes to an empty field to throw his KB. I'm not sure if he throws it like a shot or hammer but it does sound fun.

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    Love workouts like the one below.

    https://www.allthingsgym.com/atg-on-...s-plyometrics/

    There is also a video on the bodybuilding (with machines) in Gregor's series on Mohaman Ehab. I'm sure everyone has seen it.

    Apparently they do these sessions into the preparation period and not just as GPP before beginning a preparation period.

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    Very interesting thread. This topic seems to come up occasionally but probably doesn't get the attention it deserves. I think most recreational weightlifters/powerlifters in the US are guilty of trying to train too specific for most of the year. I know myself and my training partners are guilty of that. I think younger/less experienced/lower class lifters would do well to focus more of their training year on developing general qualities, the same way young athletes do multiple sports.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Echternacht View Post
    I remember reading in the early 1960s in Strength and Health magazine about the late great Waldemar Baszanowski's GPP training. It was essentially plyometrics-i.e., sprints, jumps, and throws. He did them in the off season. Back in the old USSR younger lifters did the same sort of thing. Since they were the weightlifting gods, I copied what they did. Loved doing them. Still do an abbreviated form.

    With respect to throws, one does have to throw hard just as you have to use heavy weights to get strong. It's the effort that counts.
    Could you say a little more about what types of exercises and sets/reps you used to do?

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