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Thread: Cheap pound bad alternative?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by psstein View Post
    Some form of the David Rigert method, I guess.

    OP, can you be Rigert incarnate? just do that.

    (just joking stein)

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbasic View Post
    OP, can you be Rigert incarnate? just do that.

    (just joking stein)
    Might be a problem, Rigert is still alive.

  3. #13
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    If your gym doesn't understand why they have bumpers and how they're supposed to be used, it's time to find a new gym. You're going to have a hard time training in an environment where they don't know how or why you're training the way you are.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Echternacht View Post
    Well you could just not drop the weight from overhead. It isn't that hard. If my memory is correct, bumper plates came into being in the mid1970s. Before then you had to control the weight on its way to the floor. Plates were solid iron. Simply dropping the weight would tear up your platform or damage the floor or whatever was below the floor.
    Whether it is "hard" or not, depends on the individual, and the percentage being lifted relative to his or her abilities. You can't say whether it's hard or not. Trying to control a heavy weight on the way down, in any way that actually decelerates the bar and lessens impact, places an unneccesary stress on the body and risks an unnecessary chance of injury.

    Before bumpers it was also very common to bend multiple barbells per meet, and a lot of training bars were bent. Most serious training gyms used platforms of thick plywood to absorb impact. Then they would just replace the top wood, so that lifters didn't hurt themselves lowering the weight.

  4. #14
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    Out of curiosity, how much are you dropping from overhead? I would bet it's from the deadlifts anyway.

    Is the platform 8x8? Add another layer of plywood, 3/4 inch, and another layer of the rubber stall mats.

  5. #15
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    https://www.titan.fitness/shhpad.html

    Titan fitness is selling these cheap pound pad imitations. $126.00 instead of $400 for the pound pad.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by pufatr01 View Post
    How on earth do you lower a 90%+ snatch safely without hurting yourself?
    Easy, like this



    And that's 200kg...no one here has an excuse for not being able to control a heavy snatch

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