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Thread: Fundamental of the Soviet System

  1. #1
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    Fundamental of the Soviet System

    Has anyone had a chance to read this book:

    https://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-.../dp/1943650403

    (Fundamentals of the Soviet System: The Soviet Weightlifting System, by Sisto and Rojas)

    If so, what do you think of the book? How does it compare to the books by Roman and Medvedyev?

    (I know the book is somewhat old, so sorry if this topic has already been discussed)

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie View Post
    Has anyone had a chance to read this book:

    https://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-.../dp/1943650403

    (Fundamentals of the Soviet System: The Soviet Weightlifting System, by Sisto and Rojas)

    If so, what do you think of the book? How does it compare to the books by Roman and Medvedyev?

    (I know the book is somewhat old, so sorry if this topic has already been discussed)
    I have the book. If you have read Roman' and Medvedyev it won't teach anything new, although Dr Herrera ,cuban trainer educated in the soviet union and the main contributor of data to Roja's book has some nice articles published, that are worth reading imo.

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    If you already have books from the Sportivny library by Roman, Medvedyev, Laputin, ect you will be very disappointed IMO. Helder is correct. Herrera is a in fact a valuable co-author on a number of Russian journal papers (they however are not in the book). Regrettably he is not the author of the book, he seems like a very interesting guy. "Fundamentals" IMO just scratches the surface, many books cover the subject much more extensively and better. IMO it is short on content with a large % of the book being devoted to examples of macrocycles depending on 3 sessions/wk, 4 sessions/wk, 5 sessions/wk, ect. For $9 you can buy the ebook, not an expensive investment. You can write your own review
    Last edited by robo; 09-16-2018 at 10:22 PM.

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    Save your money and get either Roman or Medvedev's books. If you're interested in the technical, sport science elements of the Soviet system, this book is worthless. If you want some example programs (none of which are all that Soviet-based, to be honest), then better options exist (e.g. Takano).

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    Quote Originally Posted by psstein View Post
    then better options exist (e.g. Takano).
    Not sure I’d agree with this. The programs in Takano’s books don’t really look like any Soviet programming I’ve come across. They also don’t look anything like the programs in Medvedyev’s book. IMO some of the programs in Takanos book are pretty ridiculous, especially in the context of drug free lifters.

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    Takano's plans just look like they are checking the boxes for optimal reps, percentages, volume and so on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DylanJM View Post
    Not sure I’d agree with this. The programs in Takano’s books don’t really look like any Soviet programming I’ve come across. They also don’t look anything like the programs in Medvedyev’s book. IMO some of the programs in Takanos book are pretty ridiculous, especially in the context of drug free lifters.
    I would tend to agree and proceed cautiously. For example master of sport the 3rd week before competition all 5 sessions have the lifter going to 90% or greater...but it is not just 90% singles; snatch 90% 2x2 and CJ 90% 2+1 x2; then once this week is over week 2 monday starts with 93 reps 6 exercises again snatch and CJ to max with more of the same. Lest you think I'm picking on Bob, I am not. Every book I get I dissect it with my present knowledge....which hopefully changes over time; realizing I can be wrong and have been wrong... BUT there was a penciled notation on this page written long ago and it is nothing like I would program. I jumped at buying this book back in 2012 and would jump again should Bob write another book (which I hope he does). On programming Bob is basically the messenger and what he presents isn't much different than the accumulated Soviet wtl literature.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie View Post
    How does it compare to the books by Roman and Medvedyev?
    Roman wants you to plan your training, your lifts in a year long plan. Increasing training weights every months by adding 1-8 kilos to your total, without testing your maxes.

    Fundamentals of the Soviet System gives you very simple macrocycles of 12 weeks long. The exercises consist of a snatch variant, C&J variant, back or front squat, and snatch pulls, in that order. The first 6 weeks you load and the last 6 weeks you go 100% several times on the classics or the back squat. If testing maxes is your thing then i guess this is the book for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    Takano's plans just look like they are checking the boxes for optimal reps, percentages, volume and so on.
    A significant observation. It is not really much different than the fallibility of linear programming.
    If we assume the lifter to be a black opaque box we dump (input) this program (numbers... 0's and 1's) into the box BUT unlike a computer program , can it be expected a guaranteed output (result)? I think not. The problem is we cannot see the workings within that unique box. Result is more about uncovering discovering the unique workings within the box and how they interact with the program than the external "program" taken in isolation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by robo View Post
    A significant observation. It is not really much different than the fallibility of linear programming.
    If we assume the lifter to be a black opaque box we dump (input) this program (numbers... 0's and 1's) into the box BUT unlike a computer program , can it be expected a guaranteed output (result)? I think not. The problem is we cannot see the workings within that unique box. Result is more about uncovering discovering the unique workings within the box and how they interact with the program than the external "program" taken in isolation.
    I agree with this. I think it’s also worth noting that many of these numbers, ratios, etc. came from analyzing training programs after the fact. The original programs may have been written based on what a coach had determined to work over a long period of time through trial and error. In many cases the numbers are a result of averages across a number of programs written by different coaches. It’s easy to see why trying to write a program based solely on these “ideals” may throw up problems. Also the way coaches distributes these numbers into an actual program can vary wildly as is evidenced by the huge difference in Medvedyev’s actual programs and Takano’s programs despite using the same base numbers. The way I look at it is if you are going to use Romans numbers of Medvedyev’s numbers then you are going to have to distribute them in a similar scheme to their programs otherwise you risk coming up with something completely ineffective.
    Last edited by DylanJM; 09-17-2018 at 01:25 PM.

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