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Thread: should I have anterior pelvic tilt on the squat?

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    should I have anterior pelvic tilt on the squat?

    Hi

    I understand I shouldn't have anterior pelvic tilt on the deadlift.

    But should I have it on the squat?

    This video by AthleneX seems to maintain anterior pelvic tilt



    This video by Strength Side says to not have anterior pelvic tilt Because if doing anterior pelvic tilt then you are not engaging your glutes.

    I've also heard to maintain a natural lordotic curve, so presumably some anterior pelvic tilt, but a small amount. Or perhaps some kind of neutral position in between anterior and posterior.

    One person I spoke to said it's ok or good to have anterior pelvic tilt going down but going up one should tighten the glutes and thus not have anterior pelvic tilt.

    So, what is the situation regarding anterior pelvic tilt on the squat?

    Thanks

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    Deliberate exaggerated tilt is no bueno. The ideal is to maintain a neutral spine throughout the lift. Some people may need to go into slight extension to prevent rounding, but deliberate extension under load is asking for a lumbar injury.

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    Quote Originally Posted by barley123 View Post
    Hi

    I understand I shouldn't have anterior pelvic tilt on the deadlift.

    But should I have it on the squat?

    This video by AthleneX seems to maintain anterior pelvic tilt



    This video by Strength Side says to not have anterior pelvic tilt Because if doing anterior pelvic tilt then you are not engaging your glutes.

    I've also heard to maintain a natural lordotic curve, so presumably some anterior pelvic tilt, but a small amount. Or perhaps some kind of neutral position in between anterior and posterior.

    One person I spoke to said it's ok or good to have anterior pelvic tilt going down but going up one should tighten the glutes and thus not have anterior pelvic tilt.

    So, what is the situation regarding anterior pelvic tilt on the squat?

    Thanks
    In the first video, anyone notice that the positions shown in the drawings are impossible to achieve?
    Last edited by Kim Goss; 11-15-2018 at 02:52 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Goss View Post
    In the first video, anyone notice that the positions shown in the drawings are impossible to achieve?
    Looks good on paper...…………..

    The old "tight hamstrings".

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    Also ankles don’t exist when we draw squat anatomy.

    Regarding the question: you should ideally maintain neutral pelvic positioning during the squat. Maybe allow some slight counternutation in the sacrum but that is millimeters if movements you most likely would not even perceive it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmund View Post
    Deliberate exaggerated tilt is no bueno. The ideal is to maintain a neutral spine throughout the lift. Some people may need to go into slight extension to prevent rounding, but deliberate extension under load is asking for a lumbar injury.
    thanks.. What about the thoracic part of the spine, should that be fully extended back? Or also neutral? Or slight thoracic extension? Does pinching the shoulder blades together encourage the upper back to be fully extended back?

    Am I supposed to pinch the shoulder blades close together and back but not fully extending the thoracic portion of the spine back?

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    Shoulder blades are separate from the spine, both should be able to move independent of one another.

    Personally, I like to spread the scapula and attempt to broaden the shoulders while simultaneously pressing up into the barbell as I squat. In my opinion this creates better trunk rigidity and aids in standing up out of the squat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by barley123 View Post
    thanks.. What about the thoracic part of the spine, should that be fully extended back? Or also neutral? Or slight thoracic extension? Does pinching the shoulder blades together encourage the upper back to be fully extended back?

    Am I supposed to pinch the shoulder blades close together and back but not fully extending the thoracic portion of the spine back?
    Also neutral. Again only slight extension if necessary to prevent rounding. Even then it's probably better to think 'brace and hold neutral' than it is to deliberately extend. Don't think about your shoulder blades, think about your elbows. Most big squatters have them slightly behind the body at the top and in line with the torso at the bottom:



    https://www.instagram.com/p/BpzJ4RRAz1A/

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    Thanks

  10. #10
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    I think "butt wink" is highly overrated. It's the new knee valgus, which everyone was having a panic attack over a year ago. Broadly speaking "neutral" is always ideal. Variance is okay, as long as you avoid extremes.
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