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Thread: Replacing pulls with powers

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    I should’ve clarified I have not seen any negative differences. Only reason to keep them in (when done correctly) is to help overload the pull for specific phases, to condition lifters to snatching and cleaning 90%+ weights more often.
    Ah, thanks.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    I should’ve clarified I have not seen any negative differences. Only reason to keep them in (when done correctly) is to help overload the pull for specific phases, to condition lifters to snatching and cleaning 90%+ weights more often.
    Couldn't be a second reason be to practice to finish the pull? For me and others who cut the pull short the pulls are great exercises to practice exactly that. I never aim to pull as high as possible, just high enough (naval height for clean pulls and sternum height for snatch pulls).

    To reverse the question, what would be advantages and disadvantages of powers?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    I have seen no difference replacing pulls (keeping volume same and using all varieties) with deadlifts at the beginner/intermediate stage or even my stage of lifting. Again, not super heavy, usually between 90-110% of best lift on average.
    So instead of say 18 reps snatch pulls, one can do 9 reps of powers and 9 reps of snatch deads?

  4. #14
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    Finishing the pull can be a misnomer with regards just to extension. Think of finishing the pull as catching the barbell instead. You will extend the same in my experience. It’s just like the push off in a sprint, you’re not actively trying to extend the rear leg because doing so would delay your swing through to the next stride. It would look as if you’re bounding instead of sprinting. The leg extension is a natural occurrence to proper force development throughout and often a follow through effect (for both sprinting and lifting).

    Advantages of powers: continued motor pattern development of the snatch/clean, developing stopping power, light speed work.

    Disadvantage: done too heavy or too often people get caught up with pulling too high as before and are unable to transition into a low squat quickly/smoothly. Height of powers should get progressively lower with weight on the barbell.

    Programming: I would do pulls/deadlifts first and then follow up with powers after to take advantage of the post-activation potentiation effect and to end on practice. If need to get stronger, more reps on pulls; if need to practice, more on powers.

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  6. #15
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    I like pulls to get used to the bar speed. 100-110% of Clean would be good for this. When attempting new maxes I can have mental issues with the reduced bar speed and bail on the lift or cut the pull short.

    I’m probably screwing up by pulling high. I’ve noticed some Japanese and Chinese move back down into the power position after extension. That’s probably useful to keep the direction change you would have in the full lift.

  7. #16
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    My issue with panda pulls/speed pulls is they don’t actually mimic the pull under at all. They actually encourage you to pull down forward under the barbell and leave it in front based my experience and observation. Too often lifters drop the chest or change the trunk angle to execute this pull under - even Chinese lifters. The hips then tend to leave the narrow area of balance between the athlete-barbell system by traveling too far outside of the base of support. This leaves the A-BS too far forward in many cases and few can ever regain their balance under the barbell.

    Accessory lifts will never be specific enough to the lifts but I would wager regular pulls and deadlifts would be more appropriate than panda pulls unless the panda pull is executed as a “failed” snatch or clean attempt.

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