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Thread: Soviet style programming at present time.

  1. #11
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    Brian - you know what to do, send those presentations my way by PM as soon as you can.

  2. Likes psstein liked this post
  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by erpel View Post
    If you want something in (natively) English shouldn't this be the job of coaches and/or sport scientists?

    I find it bizarre there's apparently no serious, i.e. fundamental WL research in the USA. Even at the highest level there seems to be just a) copying approaches which aren't applicable/missing context or b) trial & error.

    How are there still debates and arguments about basics? Why wasn't this figured out decades ago so that coach FFF has a reference (book, paper)?
    John Garhammer did some research, as did both Kyle Pierce and Mike Stone. Outside of those three, though, there's not a lot.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    I

    Erpel, it sucks in the US because there is hardly any funding for weightlifting research let alone something that coaches can agree on across the board. Unlike when I went to Ukraine I met high level Ukrainian, Russian, Belorussian, Moldovan, and my coach all agree on technique, with their own preferences regarding training methods but all underwent similar education in sports school. In the US there is still bickering over how to teach and what are effective methods or not. I would love to read detailed books from Korea and Japan if there are any. I have found some presentations from Korea with sample programs from the KNSU team I think that had a fairly high volume (12 sets each) of squatting, pulling, and lifts.
    Can you please sent me those presentations as well?

  5. #14
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    A little off topic but related.

    Don't know if any of you read the European Weightlifting Federation's Science Magazine.

    http://www.ewfed.com/ewf-scientific-magazine.html

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by psstein View Post
    John Garhammer did some research, as did both Kyle Pierce and Mike Stone. Outside of those three, though, there's not a lot.
    Did they influence real world practice or are they academic?

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    Quote Originally Posted by erpel View Post
    Did they influence real world practice or are they academic?
    Kyle Pierce's LSUS program might be one of the most influential "American" programs out there. Its pretty basic(the 10-5-3 idea) but near every weightlifter I know has either heard of it or tried it and from what I've seen of some Juggernaut training it resembles LSUS.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by erpel View Post
    Did they influence real world practice or are they academic?
    Garhammer's research influenced how American coaches taught technique. Stone and Pierce's work led to one of the more well-known American programs, LSU-S (very close to block periodization applied to WL).

  9. #18
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    Yeah Mike Stone has done some good stuff, credit where its due guys.

  10. #19
    Member Aaron Cunanan's Avatar
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    I think people lose the forest for the trees a lot of times when looking at periodization and programming strategies. I've always been a fan of the quote from Harrington Emerson: "Methods are many, principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble."

    Anyway, here are links to some publications by Stone and Pierce, both of whom I'm lucky to have as mentors.

    Stone et al. (2006) - Weightlifting: a brief overview

    Stone et al. (2006) - Weightlifting: program design

    Byrd et al. (2003) - Young weightlifters performance across time
    Aaron J. Cunanan, MS, CSCS, USAW
    Doctoral Fellow; Assistant Weightlifting Coach; Sport Science Staff
    Center of Excellence for Sport Science and Coach Education
    East Tennessee State University

    My contributions to this forum are solely my own and do not necessarily represent the position or views of East Tennessee State University or any of its partners or affiliates.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Cunanan View Post
    I think people lose the forest for the trees a lot of times when looking at periodization and programming strategies. I've always been a fan of the quote from Harrington Emerson: "Methods are many, principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble."

    Anyway, here are links to some publications by Stone and Pierce, both of whom I'm lucky to have as mentors.

    Stone et al. (2006) - Weightlifting: a brief overview

    Stone et al. (2006) - Weightlifting: program design

    Byrd et al. (2003) - Young weightlifters performance across time
    I agree completely with that philosophy. As to Mike Stone I have read all his papers and books; he is a great "strength" academic who was an olympic weightlifter and coached Olympic weightlifters, all of which is a winning trifecta

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