Likes Likes:  1
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Questions about squats....again

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Questions about squats....again

    For the past several preparation cycles I would squat three times per week: Monday was b sq 3-4 heavy triples, Wednesday was fr sq 3-4 heavy triples, and Saturday was b sq 5 sets of 5. Each week I would increase the weights by 1-2 kg. I saw pretty good improvement...that is, I could always increase the weight each week (although it did get fairly difficult to make each set). In what seems like a constant need to tinker, I'm thinking of trying out a new way to program in my squats. I'm thinking about doing heavy doubles and singles (still b sq on M, Sa and fr sq on Wed) instead.

    My question is will I be getting in enough volume to continue to see improvement in leg strength by only doing 3-4 doubles on M and Sa, and 3-4 singles on Wed (I'm also planning to do sn and cl deadlifts on Tu and Th). Secondly, what weights should I be shooting for to count as my working sets? By that I mean, I was thinking of starting to count the reps at around 95% of my c + j max (my c+j pr is close to 90% of my back squat pr and around 93% of my fr squat pr), and then adding 1-2 kg each week.

    I guess I can always try it out for a cycle or two, but I really don't want to lose progress or not progress as quickly as I could with smarter planning.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    550
    Post Thanks / Like
    Thats quite a drop in overall volume but as long as its accompanied by an equal increase in intensity it technically shouldn't make much overall difference. The only thing is it will not be more taxing on your CNS as you'll be dealing with high intensities more frequently, so you won't be able to run it as long without accumulating high fatigue. This is a similair program to the heavy single programs people run (squat to a heavy single then do some back off doubles) and everyone I know who runs it sees results but continues for too long and gets injured. Like any high intensity strength program it can serve its place but it shouldn't be run indefinitely, get your gains and get out, IMO.

    Also your CJ is 90% of your backsquat??? Thats an insane ratio, I've only ever seen something like that from a thrower I knew in college who could power clean more than he could front squat and thats cause he didn't like squatting due to his height.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by PVCPipe View Post
    Thats quite a drop in overall volume but as long as its accompanied by an equal increase in intensity it technically shouldn't make much overall difference. The only thing is it will not be more taxing on your CNS as you'll be dealing with high intensities more frequently, so you won't be able to run it as long without accumulating high fatigue. This is a similair program to the heavy single programs people run (squat to a heavy single then do some back off doubles) and everyone I know who runs it sees results but continues for too long and gets injured. Like any high intensity strength program it can serve its place but it shouldn't be run indefinitely, get your gains and get out, IMO.

    Also your CJ is 90% of your backsquat??? Thats an insane ratio, I've only ever seen something like that from a thrower I knew in college who could power clean more than he could front squat and thats cause he didn't like squatting due to his height.
    Yes, my ratio is pretty off. I just recently hit a 85 kg snatch and 100 c+j at a bw of 73, and the heaviest I've squatted (a couple of weeks prior to this) was 115 and that felt like it was a max. I can power close to 90% of my max. I've always been pretty weak compared to others growing up, so I'm sure that I am lacking just overall strength and that is the main reason why my squat is so low.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    550
    Post Thanks / Like
    Whats your height? Are you lanky enough that your pull is able to compensate for weak leg strength?

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by PVCPipe View Post
    Whats your height? Are you lanky enough that your pull is able to compensate for weak leg strength?
    176 cm.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    550
    Post Thanks / Like
    Have you considered gaining weight? You're definitely tall for your weight for the sport.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by PVCPipe View Post
    Have you considered gaining weight? You're definitely tall for your weight for the sport.
    I have, but for now I'm good with my weight. Maybe in the future...

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    541
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie View Post
    I have, but for now I'm good with my weight. Maybe in the future...
    I don’t know what your reasons are for not wanting to gain weight nor is it any of my business and it’s not up to me to dispute them but let me at least add my perspective as someone who is the same height as you and struggled for a LONG time in strength, especially in squats. I weight between 69kg-76kg for a long time. I was afraid that gaining weight meant getting fat. I finally had enough and began eating more in an attempt to gain weight after that cheesy thing that Cal Strength did for awhile where they’d recommend you a weight class and they put me up something like 22kg as a recommendation, minimum. That was it. I had enough and went for it.

    1 year later and I’m up about 10kg. I’m stronger, faster, look better, and feel better daily in life. So, while I don’t know what you’re reasoning is I can say that if you’re anything like me you’ll be chasing this magical formulation for finding technique perfections, training plans, etc and really the entire time I was missing food. It was honestly life changing.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    550
    Post Thanks / Like
    Its cool you're ok with your weight but strength gains will continue to be fairly slow in comparison. You can still get stronger but with no stimulated hypertrophy, benefits of reduced ROM, and better recovery with excess calories you just have a longer path and a lower ceiling.

  10. #10
    Member Blairbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    2,982
    Post Thanks / Like
    One of the issues of not massing to gain muscle, is it's just not that easy to build up the LBM. Small caloric surpluses just seem to increase NEAT up to 500kcals+. The younger you are, the less this may matter because of higher GH level on average (who knows if say one 35yo could have levels the same as a 20-25. I mean it could happen).

    Some of this will probably matter how much meat you have on your frame, besides whatever your hormone levels and age is. Or if you're somewhere you are popping AAS, enhanced TRT, or GH/Insulin.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •