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Thread: Tips for Warm Up Volume for Bulgarian Peak Cycle

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    Tips for Warm Up Volume for Bulgarian Peak Cycle

    I am looking for an appropriate warm up volume to be executed before reaching the "Bulgarian Peaking Cycle" loads.

    My plan is to execute six reps (2 reps x 3 sets) at about 50-60%, five reps (2 reps x 2 sets + 1 rep x 1 set) at 60-70% (obviously after the the usual movements with empty bar, 30%´s and 40%´s).

    The reason I am consulting you guys is because if my warm up reps are too low, I commit some failures at work zone (75%+). And the opposite, I supose, the failures may occur due to fatigue before the work zone.


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    With high frequency training, you don't tend to need a lengthy warmup. If you struggle with mobility or joint issues, you should have a general warmup that targets your problem areas. Other than that, the following should be sufficient.

    bar x whatever reps you need to comfortably hit depth (you can skip if you are still loose from classic lifts)
    50%x3
    60%x3
    70%x2
    75%x1

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    Thank you Matt!

    This is the kind of recommendation that I am looking for.

    I am also struggling against the following problem: often when I raise the load on the bar, I fail on my first lift of the set of this new load. After this, the remaining lifts with the same load are executed without problem. I have a suspection that this problem is also related with the warm up (and mindset too).

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    You might try putting extra effort into torso rigidity, even with the warmups. I try to think about locking the lats and abs together. The lats don't tend to get attention in the squat, but they are a major player for keeping your torso tight. Use whatever you need to get the muscles active and tight before you even take the bar out of the racks. This tension should help your body not to be taken by surprise with the extra weight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Erdman View Post
    With high frequency training, you don't tend to need a lengthy warmup. If you struggle with mobility or joint issues, you should have a general warmup that targets your problem areas. Other than that, the following should be sufficient.

    bar x whatever reps you need to comfortably hit depth (you can skip if you are still loose from classic lifts)
    50%x3
    60%x3
    70%x2
    75%x1
    sounds about right. I would be inclined to do a few sets at the very earliest weights. The idea with this kind of high frequency, low volume training is that you go straight to the heavy stuff and then have more time to rest afterwards before going again (be it the same day or the next day etc). The quicker you finish your training, the sooner you start recovering for the next one. This is a key part of this kind of system, in that if you feel bad, warming up more will just eat into your recovery time for the next session and have a knock-on effect, so cut your losses and come back better next time.

    If you are consistently missing earlier reps/sets and then things get better, then it is likely an activation/warmup issue, in that your body is not ready for much action until its almost too late. A bit more general warming up of the muscles will do you good. This doesn't have to be super heavy or even very specific, but a few rounds of some GPP movements for 5-10 minutes might actually make a big difference.

    I remember one of my biggest problems when trying to train in this way was that I wanted to save myself for the heaviest weights, and exerted as little energy before as possible. However, the end result was that I would need multiple waves to actually get to the intended heaviest sets, and I was too fatigued by that point to do much else. Instead, I should have warmed up for longer, held back that excitement, and then when I was ready, work up to the heavy ones.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CNL View Post
    I remember one of my biggest problems when trying to train in this way was that I wanted to save myself for the heaviest weights, and exerted as little energy before as possible. However, the end result was that I would need multiple waves to actually get to the intended heaviest sets, and I was too fatigued by that point to do much else. Instead, I should have warmed up for longer, held back that excitement, and then when I was ready, work up to the heavy ones.
    Great point. Warmups are part of training, not to be taken lightly. (pun intended)

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  11. #7
    AKA Tony Arkitect FFF's Avatar
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    Bulgarian training is the keto of Weightlifting.

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    Hey Tony, I liked a lot your vlog!

    Precious contribution!

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