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Thread: Respect the Sport?

  1. #11
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    https://www.medicaldaily.com/why-was...nd-your-399815

    https://www.medonegroup.com/aboutus/blog/your-hands

    https://www.wired.com/2007/01/cell-phones-fil/

    https://www.cleanlink.com/news/artic...nd-Rule--17362



    More germs exist on a phone or keyboard than on a toilet seat
    The number of germs on fingertips doubles after using the toilet
    Time is a significant factor in the transfer of bacteria from a floor surface to a piece of food
    If the transfer of bacteria occurred, the contact required five seconds or more.
    i don't think so.

    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    Yeah, let’s make the majority of the world play by our rules. /s (sadly I have to punctuate with that)

    Your shoes walked across the bottom of a bathroom floor at some point during a competition, they are definitely not cleaner than your hands.
    Last edited by ryanwtyler; 02-21-2019 at 11:00 AM.

  2. #12
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    Toilet seats are not the bathroom floor, which is constantly stewing from the moisture and bacteria from feces, urine, and the outside world.

    And again, why does it seem to me that US lifters are the only who seen to give a shit that their “freedom” to place their feet on sporting equipment is taken away? Why does it matter that much to even discuss this beyond, “ok, that’s easy enough to do.”

  3. #13
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    i don't know. However I bet you'd be less likely to hear people from other countries complaining about the rule. I agree though. it's easy enough to do.

    i'm pretty sure that hands are way way dirtier than WL shoes.



    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    Toilet seats are not the bathroom floor, which is constantly stewing from the moisture and bacteria from feces, urine, and the outside world.

    And again, why does it seem to me that US lifters are the only who seen to give a shit that their “freedom” to place their feet on sporting equipment is taken away? Why does it matter that much to even discuss this beyond, “ok, that’s easy enough to do.”

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by b_degennaro View Post
    I find it hilarious it seems to really be only Americans who are upset and complaining about any of this. I actually am looking forward to all the failed lifts over this ruling.

    Kono called rolling or spinning the barbell with the foot disrespectful. We can use our hands for a reason. I rarely see Asian countries do this. Maybe they’ll push the plate with the foot but I can’t recall them actually touching the barbell with the foot. It is really only putting the foot on the shaft that everyone doesn’t want. In Ukraine they put their foot on the sleeves to pin it to take plates off but never the shaft. Most countries drop the barbell from waist height, even Europeans. Good bars are durable and most of the time the sleeves are hitting rubber. ATG has a video of everyone dropping empty bars at 2015 Worlds but then concludes with Lü gently placing it back on the concrete floor, off the platform.

    For many Asian and middle eastern cultures it is a “cleanliness” thing. As my coach had put it to me the first day I trained with him: “would you step over another human being if they were laying there or would you walk around?” And “would you put your foot on your partner or friend?” It is about treating the barbell as a person and your partner in this sport. The body language of standing over the barbell, looking down at it, and using your foot (aka a 10 foot pole) is not respectful if you look at it that way.

    Regarding having fun in the training halls, we only see one small glimpse of their training. We have absolutely no context for what the gym’s plan is. I don’t think any coach, club, or nation just rigidly adheres to your straw man “iron samurai.” There is a reason for off season training and planned breaks.

    We aren’t there on a controlled competition date. With clubs that have multiple coaches and dozens of not hundreds of lifters, who the hell knows what they are doing. No one group would be on the same training plan, ever. That said, the ability to relax and turn it off, then turn it on is a skill that is honed over years. Athletes who can do this, do it extremely well.

    When a lifter is directly set up to the barbell, the entire gym is quiet. Immediately prior and after the lift starts are the only times I am hearing people shout and yell encouragement at them. Also, like above, if it is a large training hall, no one is likely on the same plan or even coached by one person. There are many coaches and groups lifting at the same time in large training halls. I think the Korean National University Sports Institute has 6 coaches overlooking 10 or more high level athletes at the same time, more depending on if they are lower qualified lifters I assume.
    This post had nothing to do with the new rulings, I actually had to go back and look up what you were talking about.

    Regarding your comment about "their gym plan" https://www.reddit.com/r/weightlifti...e_for_doubles/ This has zero to do with training plan and was just lifters fucking around like I had been seeing more recently. The vid was korean lifter slamming a light bar into the ground to have it bounce super high then jumping under it. This at the time was fairly common along with those tandem clean and jerk videos(that still occasionally pop up) to show lifters just having fun.

    There was no straw man, I was refering to people who explicitly have said things like this online and in articles and then used traditional eastern european countries as reference I did not say any country strictly adhere to these policies. A strawman is to intentional misrepresent a position to defeat it easier, yet all I did was state I don't believe in the rules above(that Eastern European countries tend to show this side more frequently) and am glad to see them going away. As Psstein pointed out quite astutely this is likely due to how poor those countries were especially at the time when videos were being released during the dark ages of weightlifting content.

    Thats good for your gym, but I've been in just as many gyms where its common to shout at lifters. Spending an even small amount of time online and you'll hear "UP UP UP/ DRIVE/ PUSH/ FINISH/ PULL/ GET UNDER IT" etc etc all during lifts.
    Last edited by PVCPipe; 02-21-2019 at 03:09 PM.

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    The rules about not touching the bar with your feet are some of the dumbest rules I've ever heard of being implemented in the history of any sport. Clearly they were just done to quiet a vocal and annoying minority. There are real problems with officiating and enforcing the rules, yet the ruling committee decided the most important issue was whether your foot touched the barbell.

    This rule clearly isn't about bacteria or sanitation. If it were, they would make every lifter use hand sanitizer between every lift, both in competition and during warmups. They would also eliminate the chalk, as it holds bacteria worse than anything else in the gym. And they would force Boady Santavy to stop bleeding all over the bar during the World Weightlifting Championship, and cover up his open bleeding wound. But they didn't, because no one actually cares. But a handful of loud people cry for years about "disrespecting" the bar, and suddenly a molehill has become a mountain.

    If it is about respect, then we've just delved into the realm of the ridiculous and silly. The barbell is inanimate. It neither commands nor deserves respect beyond simply not using it outside its intended use and causing it intentional damage. If you're not damaging it, you're respecting it. I push bars with my feet all the time, while being perfectly respectful. And I of course step over the bar every single time, because they aren't human, they have no feelings, they don't know that I'm stepping over them, and walking around something that is 8" tall and 1" thick is stupid.

    I also train as loudly or as quietly as I choose, on any given day. Some days I prefer pure silence. Some days I crank metal music and yell. Neither is disrespectful as long as it doesn't bother other lifters.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisG View Post
    The rules about not touching the bar with your feet are some of the dumbest rules I've ever heard of being implemented in the history of any sport. Clearly they were just done to quiet a vocal and annoying minority. There are real problems with officiating and enforcing the rules, yet the ruling committee decided the most important issue was whether your foot touched the barbell.

    This rule clearly isn't about bacteria or sanitation. If it were, they would make every lifter use hand sanitizer between every lift, both in competition and during warmups. They would also eliminate the chalk, as it holds bacteria worse than anything else in the gym. And they would force Boady Santavy to stop bleeding all over the bar during the World Weightlifting Championship, and cover up his open bleeding wound. But they didn't, because no one actually cares. But a handful of loud people cry for years about "disrespecting" the bar, and suddenly a molehill has become a mountain.

    If it is about respect, then we've just delved into the realm of the ridiculous and silly. The barbell is inanimate. It neither commands nor deserves respect beyond simply not using it outside its intended use and causing it intentional damage. If you're not damaging it, you're respecting it. I push bars with my feet all the time, while being perfectly respectful. And I of course step over the bar every single time, because they aren't human, they have no feelings, they don't know that I'm stepping over them, and walking around something that is 8" tall and 1" thick is stupid.

    I also train as loudly or as quietly as I choose, on any given day. Some days I prefer pure silence. Some days I crank metal music and yell. Neither is disrespectful as long as it doesn't bother other lifters.
    Jon North said something once on his podcast along the lines of "Respect the bar? The bar broke Donny's neck and it will break yours if you let it, why do we need to treat it so nicely when it doesn't return the favor?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisG View Post
    The rules about not touching the bar with your feet are some of the dumbest rules I've ever heard of being implemented in the history of any sport.
    Exaggeration for effect, much?

    Quote Originally Posted by KrisG View Post
    The barbell is inanimate. It neither commands nor deserves respect beyond simply not using it outside its intended use and causing it intentional damage. If you're not damaging it, you're respecting it.
    So if I was handling, say, a firearm, I don't need to worry about handling/treating it with respect because it's inanimate, regardless of the fact it could end my life or the life of someone I care about?

    (I'm not necessarily equating barbells and guns, but I don't think your argument holds any water).

    Quote Originally Posted by KrisG View Post
    . . . walking around something that is 8" tall and 1" thick is stupid.
    Throwing a perfectly good barbell into the air and trying to jump underneath it and catch it without getting guillotined is kind of stupid too, depending on your perspective.

    I really find it interesting how up in arms some people get about the respect thing, on both sides.

  9. #18
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    Touching the bar with your foot isn’t disrespectful. The new technical rule is stupid because it doesn’t move the sport forward - it just creates more confusion for spectators and tv audiences.

    Weightlifting needs fewer technical rules, not more.

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by PVCPipe View Post
    TL;DR: Asian countries are replacing Easter European countries as the most dominant lifters and don't tend to follow old-school rules like not dropping the bar, keeping quiet, no using their feet, etc while training which some people to this day say are signs of disrespect and lack of seriousness amongst other training populations.

    I've said a few times on this sub in a few different threads I've never been a fan of the "Iron Samurai" esque approach some people have to weightlifting. Its just picking up a bar, we're not monks in a temple. Though I do not begrudge people who have their rules of respect for their gym or equipment, I do however dislike when its pushed upon other people as an all or nothing situation and if you don't follow these sorts of arbitrary rules its why youre not good and you don't respect the sport(hence the title).

    The 'rules' of respect being; don't touch the bar with your foot, don't walk over the bar, don't drop the bar with no weight or light weight, don't shout or yell, be quiet when another person is lifting, no idle chatting, playing around, and I'm sure there are others but that's off the top of my head. These rules are then backed up with how a lot of Eastern European countries behave in training and for awhile they were the most dominant forces in weightlifting so people appealed to the authority and said "Look theyre the best and do this, if you don't behave this way youre not serious enough". But now the most dominant lifters in the world tend to be Asian (Iran, China, Taiwan) and very good lifters are produced in neighboring countries like Japan, Korea, Indonesia, etc. These countries don't seem to follow these rules at all, watch any number of videos and you get lots of shouting during lifts and while watching their teammates, you see bar drops galore no mattter the weight, they kick and move the bar with whatever limb they want, there are videos of them shooting the shit during training, and few funny videos of them doing weird stuff for fun to break up the monotony of being a professional athlete.

    With these athletes taking center stage, I think its very hard to defend the opinion that you don't respect the sport if you don't follow arbitrary gym rules. Though again if its a matter of just protecting your own personal equipment from damage thats not what I'm talking about.
    Who. Cares.

  11. #20
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    It's called discipline, it builds character. I can see not many people here have ever been in the military.

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