Likes Likes:  4
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Weightlifting and Sports - Observations of an old Dude

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like

    Weightlifting and Sports - Observations of an old Dude

    I had my first opportunity to see the results of the classic lifts on my athletic performance outside of lifting.

    My son is just starting to play basketball and he's been bugging me to watch me play. I haven't played a pick up game in 10 years and haven't done any sort of sport that requires that amount of sprinting and jumping in ages. Took him to a pick up game with me and realized just how much weightlifting has helped me.

    First and foremost at 6"2 I was always able to dunk in games, always had a good vertical. 10 years ago I could barely touch the rim anymore at 27. Fast forward 10 years and while I can't dunk in a game I could throw one down off the bounce with a running start. The biggest difference in jumping though was how fast I can get up off the floor now. I can't jump as high anymore but the quickness off the floor makes up for it on my shot and defensively.

    Strength wise I was able to finish plays with people grabbing me and fouling me easily. Way easier to get position, way easier to knock people off the block, boxing out was soooooo easy. The leg and hip strength gained from lifting plays so well into basketball skills in the post.

    Footwork; 10 years not playing a game and my footwork was 10 times better than when I played regularly. Quicker transitions with the up and unders, drop step was way more effective and faster as well. I could go fast and hard but still felt in control.

    Overall I think that the classic lifts should be taught to young kids at an early age regardless of whether they want to be a weightlifter. If I can see this level of athletic improvement at my age I can only imagine how much more effective a player I would have been in my prime had I trained these lifts regularly instead of doing a bunch of quarter squats "to help my vertical" and calf raises. I was also told to avoid weights as they'd make me slow and told to do endless push ups and crunches instead. Lessons learned, I'll be making sure my son doesn't fall into the same traps during his playing career.

    Anybody else have similar experiences with carry over to their respective favourite sport outside of weightlifting?

  2. Likes Blairbob, jockomoron liked this post
  3. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    229
    Post Thanks / Like
    Anybody else have similar experiences with carry over to their respective favourite sport outside of weightlifting?
    Other than maintaining a reasonable level of general fitness as I have moved from activity to activity, I don't think I've experienced much carry over. But then I tend to do very different kinds activity. My experience goes like this--weightlifting (young man)--distance running--bicycle racing--weightlifting (middle age)--dance (which I still do)--weightlifting (old man).

    Great that you are playing basketball with your son. My grand son and son play together 2 or 3 times a week. Grandson is 11 years old and plays hockey and baseball. Son is really into what grandson does. I think doing sports with a parent is one of the most rewarding things a parent can do.

    I'd like to see grandson get stronger. I think it would make him a better hockey and baseball player. He does do some medicine ball with his dad, but I've been encouraging dad to do the old York Course 1 twice a week with son.

  4. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    199
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by PK33 View Post
    Anybody else have similar experiences with carry over to their respective favourite sport outside of weightlifting?
    Short answer = I don't know. . . and that's also the long answer. At 47 -- ~10 years older than you? -- I just can't go out and give other athletic endeavors a serious go without serious joint pain. In my late 30s, before kid #2 came along and before I took up barbell strength training (age 42) and weightlifting (~43), I used to play pick-up basketball a couple of times a week, go for an ~30 mile mountain bike ride on Sundays, and partake in master's swimming stuff 3-4x/week. Now, unless I took a serious de-load week with no squats, any weekend biking would have to be fairly leisurely, and there's no way I could run (as in play full-court) without serious pain . . . of course, I'm also about 8 inches shorter than you, so there's a need for more speed and a bit more "up" on every play. That being said, I did go out on an empty court about 1 month ago and shot around for 15-20 minutes: my shot was pretty consistent for not having put a basketball in a net for ~4 years (probably because of the better lower-body strength) and, on lay-ups (though every landing hurt my knees), I felt like my proximity to the backboard was at least at-level or only slightly below where it was 8-10 years ago. The problem with an "old dude" (or especially, in my case, an "even older dude") judging "carry over" to a sport outside WL is that performance in the endeavors in which we engaged as younger "dudes" is heading downward, so the best WL could probably do for us is provide a better parachute to slow the descent. Unless one is constantly monitoring one's rate of decline (descent) in these other sports, it is hard to know if WL is doing anything to "carry over" -- i.e. pull the parachute on the descent decline -- to the other sports.

    Quote Originally Posted by PK33 View Post
    Overall I think that the classic lifts should be taught to young kids at an early age regardless of whether they want to be a weightlifter. If I can see this level of athletic improvement at my age I can only imagine how much more effective a player I would have been in my prime. . .
    This I very much agree with. I don't have sons; just daughters who are fairly involved in gymnastics. However, barbell strength movements and, over the past few months, the classic weightlifting movements, have become an important part of their off-"field" training regimen. Even over this short time frame, I do see improvements in ability to absorb force and to then "re-deploy" it in power output. As far as things like improvement in jumping ability. . . I think that might be largely a genetic thing, with strength training being more for enabling an athlete to better deploy and control the natural ability they have. My one kid is jumping on higher boxes in the gym than gals 2-3 years older (and 4-6 inches taller) than her. . . but she was doing that in week 2 and it is pretty hard to tell what portion of anyone's gains in vertical are due to "squat & jerk gains" or due just to the fact that they are practicing jumping (be it at basketball practice, volleyball practice, gymnastic training, or just post-WL-training box-jumps).

  5. Likes Blairbob liked this post
  6. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    86
    Post Thanks / Like
    Picked up Jiu Jitsu recently. It's kind of hilarious how weak non-lifters are. Obviously, higher belts easily dominate me, but I'm more than capable of fending off new blue belts on down.

  7. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    692
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by PK33 View Post
    Overall I think that the classic lifts should be taught to young kids at an early age regardless of whether they want to be a weightlifter. If I can see this level of athletic improvement at my age I can only imagine how much more effective a player I would have been in my prime
    I taught my son to lift when he was 11 and obviously he was more practicing the skill than training for strength. It wasn't too long, maybe 6-12 months, before his strength superiority was apparent in soccer and baseball. Maybe he was simply more confident as he knew he was getting stronger as his lifts increased. When he stepped into a pack and moved others off the ball and put his foot down, no one was getting it away. In baseball, he was the leadoff hitter as he was the fastest, but hit with a lot of power after he started lifting. At the time, at his age, no one else was lifting and his strength advantage was obvious.

  8. Likes jockomoron liked this post
  9. #6
    Member Judas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,663
    Post Thanks / Like
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Bourgeois View Post
    Picked up Jiu Jitsu recently. It's kind of hilarious how weak non-lifters are. Obviously, higher belts easily dominate me, but I'm more than capable of fending off new blue belts on down.
    Its a fighter thing. Fighters are literally (i am absolutely using the word literally here) THE worst... when it comes to strength training. MASSIVE fighter town, where i live, and the gyms are full ov them, all different styles/sports/motivations, many coaches. Sport fighters (like legit sports, karate, TKD), TONS ov MMA obviously, nightclub tough guys (some legitimately bad ones too). Across the entire spectrum here, the method is the same: complete and total isolation high rep bodybuilding. Slow perfect isolation reps. Upper body only. 'Core' consists ov plank and stability ball stuff. There is only one kid here who crosstrains with powerbuilding (pretty strong, 500 squat, 600 dead), and he utterly dominates his sport. The others? tons ov competitive MMA guys, and no one you'll ever hear ov. These guys literally have trouble benching 135lbs. How can you win a fight with the upper body strength ov a girl? And the explosiveness ov a pumped-up bodybuilder? I'd take these barroom badasses anyday over these trained MMA in a real fight... at least they take steroids and bench and deadlift.

    I've wrestled around with some MMA friends, a couple very experienced ones, and man... there is just NOTHING there... strength/power wise. Yeah, i'm pretty strong, but these are full-sized fighters.

  10. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    118
    Post Thanks / Like
    OP,

    We sound very similar. I'm also 6'2" and grew up playing basketball and could dunk. When I got into 'powerbuilding' after college and got up to 280 I could still grab the rim with two hands. When I tried actual competitive bodybuilding was when my athleticism went out the window. Just garbage. Couldn't run or jump worth crap anymore in my mid 30s. Took up weightlifting in my late 30s, but didn't play basketball anymore. My brother talked me into playing in a rec league when I was almost 40 without having played in years. Thought I would be terrible, but it actually went pretty well. Didn't try dunking because old knees, but grabbed the rim pretty easily. I just stood in the post and rebounded and got tons of putbacks, not because of my awesome athletic prowess or prodigous strength, but because the other dudes (most of them in their 20s and early 30s) were just SO pitifully weak. My wind was actully not bad either to my surprise. My brother was crossfitting at the time and he got gassed way before I did running full court. Now that I'm into raw powerlifting at age 43 I'd like to play sometime and see how it goes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •