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Thread: SHW men have the worst technique.

  1. #1
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    SHW men have the worst technique.

    This isn't really related to the goal of this sport, but rather the personal enjoyment one gets from an audience perspective. From watching human movement.

    AKA Does this look athletic?

    Too many SHW men have unappealing technique which also may or may not hinder their performance.

    It's mostly poor positions and poor movement. The extra body mass hinders them in setting up, in pulling, in the bar path as a whole. They can't sit deep in the snatch or clean. They push press the bar more than jerk it. The huge weights lead to poorer elbow lock.

    They struggle against their technical deficits with much surplus strength. It's SHW after all. But IMHO this "balance" is not well adjusted in too many of them, past and present.

    Exceptions like Talakhadze exist, but are very rare as opposed to light weight classes where one could argue multiple lifters having optimal technique in any given high level competition.

    Videos say more than words here.

    Examples would be plenty: Chemerkin, Minasyan, Mart Seim, Salimi, Taranenko, Rezazadeh, Djangabaev, etc. And it's not just those at the top.

    Generally the "technique" - quality of WL movement - decreases with weight gain. It also happens with women, but not as stark.

    Yes, they're good WLs and all that. But I prefer watching a middle weight women's class where the whole podium is near or at textbook technique as opposed to the struggles of handling giant bodies while holding a barbell.

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    I could not agree more. I hate when people use those who lift the most absolute weight as examples of technique. I've rarely been impressed by watching the supers; many times they just look like amateurs. Lasha is the first super in decades that I enjoy watching lift. Kim Tae-Hyun is one of the only supers that comes to mind in the last 20-30 years that has good technique in my opinion.

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    Some of your examples are correct but Taranenko absolutely does not belong on that list. He moved exceptionally well with a barbell and had great flexibility/positions.

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    Perhaps he doesn't belong among those names, but subjectively he became worse the heavier the weights were when he went from 110 to 145+. Mostly jerk and balance.

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    Speaking of Taranenko, are there any other examples of lifters who use a thumbless jerk technique?

    I tend to agree with the OP.

    Lasha is truly an outlier, Albegov and Chigashev not bad. Salimi's snatch is ok. Turmanidze is always under-rated. But that's about it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkpeter View Post
    Speaking of Taranenko, are there any other examples of lifters who use a thumbless jerk technique?
    Huster



    Rack jerks start at around 1min 30sec

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkpeter View Post
    Speaking of Taranenko, are there any other examples of lifters who use a thumbless jerk technique?
    Frank Mantek had a thumbless jerk as well.

    As to the OP, Charniga had a related article about the diminishing return of BW gains a few months ago.

    Most of the SHWs have awful jerks. Salimi and Alihosseni push press with a split, as did Chemerkin and Rezazadeh. Lovchev had a great jerk, though, as did Weller.

    Watching Minasyan lift is just painful.

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    Just want to chime in that I totally agree with you all!! I've been saying this for a while (not out loud, because most lifters look up to SHW's due to sheer numbers that are put up).

    Weller had decent tech for a super, but that's about it. Mostly, those guys rely on stupid amounts of strength, imho.

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    Years and years ago, one ov my go-to 'technique' videos, was an early one ov Polovnikov snatching 170x2. Pretty sure he was an 85 lifter at the time. Utter command ov the bar, perfect timing. When he started to get really famous, and was well into the 105's, he just wasn't fun to watch anymore. Fucking brutally powerful, just a beast, which... is fun in different ways, but technically? Just a basher now. I've seen this happen a few times when GOOD lifters climb the classes.

    I never saw Ilin lift at 85, but i'd imagine it was a lot crisper and technical than he is now. The guy defines beast... and he's fast and fearless... but technically, i dont like him. I wonder what he was like as an 85.

    I haven't been watching too much lately, but i wonder how Tian Tao has weathered his rather massive and abrupt weight change.

    As for the actual supers... they've never been my favorite class to watch. Women's sure... but only because ov Kashirina.

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    Those Bozos... it's not as if lifting the heaviest weight of all time is HARD, or anything...

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