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Thread: 45 minute sessions

  1. #1
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    45 minute sessions

    Yo yo,
    Gyms are opening back up here, but for the forseeable you have to book time online, and are limited to 45 minutes sessions, a maximum of 5 times a week.
    What would your plan look like? What are your weaknesses? Do you have time to address them?
    go!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by CNL View Post
    Yo yo,
    What would your plan look like?
    Continue training in the garage.

    I'm slow as fuck though. If I only had 45 minutes of gym time, I'd be warming up in the parking lot (so long as I could get away with that), and doing maybe 1-2 exercises per session. Maybe like a snatch/snatch pull day, clean/RDL day, jerk/push press day, squat/core and front squat/core days.

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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheJonty View Post
    Continue training in the garage.

    I'm slow as fuck though. If I only had 45 minutes of gym time, I'd be warming up in the parking lot (so long as I could get away with that), and doing maybe 1-2 exercises per session. Maybe like a snatch/snatch pull day, clean/RDL day, jerk/push press day, squat/core and front squat/core days.
    What do you like to do for core on your squat days?

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    Here is what I have done in the past, and would recommend that you do:

    1. Get a workout timer or watch that measures minutes and seconds if you don't have access to a gym clock.

    2. Plan an exercise schedule that has three exercises per workout.

    3. Use the time before your 45 minute booking starts to get warm/stretched/supple and ready to start.

    4. Sit down between sets and use the workout timer to take 90 second rests between work sets. Take two minutes rest if you're doing particularly heavy work sets. Be disciplined about this.

    5. Transition between exercises at 15 minute intervals.


    You'll notice that I haven't specified what exercises you should do. That's because I don't know your individual circumstances or your level of proficiency & experience.

  6. #5
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    The biggest jump in results I made was between the 1969 Nationals (early June) and the Philadelphia Open (early January, 1970). In that time interval I took a month off, moved from Iowa to New Jersey and began a new job starting October 1. Before October, my training was minimal. I had also decided to go up a weight class and change my training routine.

    I based my new training on what Bob Bednarski and Gary Glenny were doing. I came up with the following:

    Monday--press
    Tuesday--clean and jerk
    Wednesday--back squats
    Thursday--Snatch
    Saturday--Press, snatch, clean and jerk, and front squats

    There were no pulls, no power lifts, no nothing except the classical lifts and squats. The intensities generally ranged between 85% and 95% and once I hit 80% everything (except squats) was singles, kind of a Bulgarian approach before there there was a Bulgarian approach. I should also say that this routine was completely different than anything I had done before. I only used this routine up to the meet where I made 8 out of 9 attempts. Don't know how long my sessions were. I'm guessing the week day sessions were about an hour (including warm-up and warm-down).

    If I were to use my previous experience as a guide, here is what I would do

    Monday--snatch
    Tuesday--clean and jerk
    Wednesday--squat (any)
    Thursday--snatch
    Saturday--snatch, clean and jerk
    Sunday--squat

    Looks like a Bulgarian approach with a little lighter weights, especially those over 90%.

    In real life I couldn't train on Sundays. Home front would have shot me. Home front did like the shorter sessions.

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  8. #6
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    Currently I am training 45-60 minutes per day, including warm-up. It's all I've got time for currently, even with a home gym. It isn't ideal, but life has been busy this year. I am training 7 days per week, due to the lack of time and volume, but I could make a 5 day week work. I'm doing 1 lift per day, and some minor accessory work afterward.

    Currently I am doing a large quantity of heavy lifting and a lot of movement at work, so I rarely need much warm-up, in fact I'm usually beyond warm to the point of tired, especially my back. But occasionally I do warm-up, but even on my days off work, 10-15 minutes is plenty. Once I'm ready to go, I just load the bar and work my way up.

    If you've got accessory work planned after your main lifts, lift quicker. If time won't allow it that day due to fatigue or missed reps, skip the accessory work.

  9. #7
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    I am glad to see ya back, Gary!

  10. #8
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    45 min to train is problematic. I guess we should consider this imposition due to the constraints of the covid pandemic vs the all to often heard on wtl forums “I’ve only got this much time to train because my life is so busy that’s all the time I have.” I have great sympathy for the 1st and little to none for the second.

    I like the wisdom of age and experience of Gary.

    When your time is limited you work the very basics (the competitive lifts at that time; Press,sn, CJ) and remove all the superfluous (remove all pulls and limit the volume of squats). The concept of a hierarchy of sport specific exercise selection. Importantly In Gary’s case the transition to shorter sessions was made easier because I believe he had a strong previous historical background (years) of olylifting, was already a high level lifter, his technique was refined and good, he was strong. The week day sessions were minimally 60min. For the most part one exercise and hit it hard. The weekend session much longer.
    IMO working one’s weaknesses is not even remotely a possibility or the even the priority in limited 45 min sessions. While you are working your weakness the basics could be falling apart rapidly; esp. technique in beginner to intermediate level lifters. Until the time restraints change you will always be struggling just to barely maintain current lifting fitness and technique.

    45-60 min sessions worked well for Bulgarians, BUT they did anywhere from 20-35 of them a week. 45 min sessions are just right for a 12 yr starting out the 1st year in olylifting, or me approaching 70 yrs old who no longer does the snatch or CJ and just wants to keep strength by alternating back squat with clean deadlifts every 2nd day. So it could work for extremes but for most others it is an exercise(excuse the pun) in futility and large frustration. But I suppose it comes down to the adage that something no matter how small or weak a stimulus is better than NOTHING.

    Obviously you would do your warmup before entering the gym and any cool down and related exercises also outside of the gym. A big problem with limited time and going heavy is the injury potential, add to that short rest periods and or age and that could magnify the problem. Add some weird unaccustomed time slots in the day like 6am or 7 am training and more potential for shit to happen.

    I’m a big fan of getting sessions done quickly (75-120 min) with focus/concentration/intention and with little chit chat. The rest periods between sets will vary depending on circumstance/task/goal. Short rest periods will most influence strength endurance but will generally be a big problem when wts get very heavy and the goals are RFD or absolute strength or explosive strength with heavy loads.

    An example of playing with rest interval this week, the exercise was very light front squats 85kgx5x5 the side note to the lifter was “ you CAN increase the intensity of the exercise by decreasing the rest interval” so she used that OPTION and did ALL the 5 sets in 5min.

    WTL parallels life in that shit does happen (unexpectedly and often at the worst time) and you must make optimistic well thought out alternate plans. I am only too aware of that. An example. The beginning of 2020 I spent 8 weeks in Mexico, I was looking forward to and was excited about training at the gym I had trained at on previous years. Arriving in Mexico I found the gym had closed. There was an alternative at a hotel, but on viewing no oly bar or squat rack and a bunch of terrible machines. I opted believe it or not to lift rocks in the hot jungle for my entire stay in Mexico. This was a new pursuit or novelty for me, about 45min done on alternate days. The other new pursuit was short sprints throughout my daily walk and a few jumps onto benches.

    old geezer lifting rocks of which there was no shortage of varying sizes and dimensions. TIP: Always check what’s under a rock in the Mexican jungle before picking it up. Gloves and long pants and leather bib would have come in handy (I had none) Oh……and air-conditioning

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B_iUr6kH6Oz/

    The biggest surprise for me was I didn’t lose much of my old man strength (in 18 months will be in 70-75yr Masters category). These lifts below were made after ~6- 8 wks of returning to a very limited BB training (after the 8 wk cycle of NO BB training) back squat 120kgx5 no wraps or belt, clean deadlift 155kgx3 no straps, belt ect.

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B_iTcR3HQwm/
    clean dead lift 155kgx3

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B-93bFggsXd/
    back squat 120kgx5

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  12. #9
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    2 main exercises per session. Focusing on quality of movement first, volume and density (# lifts per unit time) second, intensity third. If you need to, cut back intensity in order to prioritise quality/volume/density.


    Some kind of quick lift or variation 3-5 times a week. The particular variation should addresses your technical shortcomings. Competition lifts (Snatch from floor, jerk from floor) at least once a week, each.

    Don't rest more than 60s between light weights on the way up for the quick lifts, closer to 90s as you get close to your top sets. If you're doing warmup sets on the bar/40/50kg etc.: unloading, finding new plates next to the platform, loading and setting up for the lift is enough rest. 90-120s rest between sets at top working weight.

    Do around 3-5 strength lifts (according to your own weaknesses) per week. Snatch/Clean/Romanian Pulls, Push Press variations, Squat/Lunge variation, etc. Not rocket science. These can be performed with shortened rest times and somewhat decreased loads in order to maintain reasonable velocity and good hypertrophy. For example 8x5 @ 65-70%, 60s rest.



    Play around with bodyweight exercises outside of the gym for your hypertrophy work. I can think of very few lifters (read: male WWC medallists) who wouldn't be able to add mass to their upper body, torso and legs with properly creative bodyweight training, especially if it follows fatigue from heavier strength work.

    Hypertrophy of the glute max may be a little bit difficult, maybe outside of a single leg 90° back extension hold @ parallel. Reps/time could track a little high, but still low enough to hypertrophy muscles. Calisthenics people with small legs usually only have small legs because they're either not creative enough or don't care about big legs.


    Myo-rep style training for hypertrophy is also an effective time saver. Perform an activation set - 1-2 reps shy of failure, 10-20 total reps. Take 3-5 breaths, then rep out again until 1-2 reps from failure. The activation set and each mini set counts as one set each e.g. 1 activation set + 3 mini sets = 4 sets of hypertrophy training.

    Fans of historical lifting or old coots may find this reminiscent of the 20 reps with 10RM super squat program, in which 1 set of 20 acted like 5 sets of normal squats. And also made the lifter want to die.

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