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Thread: Why it's OK for Kids to Get Strong! (i.e, pro-weightlifting article with references)

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    Why it's OK for Kids to Get Strong! (i.e, pro-weightlifting article with references)

    Hello!

    For those of you who need some research to convince sport coaches why kids need to lift weights, here's a pro-weightlifting article I wrote that has several compelling references to help champion the cause. It's written primarily for a track and field magazine, but the references should prove useful for all sports. Just something I wanted to pass along.

    https://simplifaster.com/articles/yo...ning-benefits/

    Kim Goss, MS, CSCS

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    Nice article Kim. My 10 and 7 y/o grandsons are lifting now. Doing pretty well too!

    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Goss View Post
    Hello!

    For those of you who need some research to convince sport coaches why kids need to lift weights, here's a pro-weightlifting article I wrote that has several compelling references to help champion the cause. It's written primarily for a track and field magazine, but the references should prove useful for all sports. Just something I wanted to pass along.

    https://simplifaster.com/articles/yo...ning-benefits/

    Kim Goss, MS, CSCS
    ... I like/agree with everything about the article, except the first couple of paragraphs.
    The disconnect between Abadjiev and a athlete's health is vast... especially in the context of a youth (puberty, hormones, steroids, etc.)

    Nine years ago, I attended a seminar by Ivan Abadjiev,
    y tho?
    He or his training methods have no relevancy to the modern day.
    Without the egregious drug use, and a "do anything that matters throwing the athlete's long term health to the wind" program that is supported by a centralized gov't...I don't think there is a thing to learn from him really in the modern day: Programming wise, and/or he exactly wasn't a technique guru or anything along those lines either.

    Maybe back in 1980 to 2000. But not what we know today.

    During the Q&A section, one coach asked Abadjiev at what age athletes could start lifting maximum weights. His answer: 8. Perplexed, the coach clarified his question by explaining that he meant maximum weights—as in 100 percent. Abadjiev’s answer: 8. The audience was stunned. After all, medical experts had warned us that heavy weights could permanently damage the growth plates of young athletes, stunting their growth and creating permanent disability. Although Abadjiev’s approach is designed to produce Olympic champions and is quite extreme (involving multiple training sessions per day), there are many benefits to getting young athletes to spend a little time in the weight room. For starters, consider the demands that many of our young athletes go through today—those that only play one sport
    This is broken clock is right twice a day thing here .... "The Butcher" (his nick name) could care LESS for the health of his own athletes. IIRC, he didn't train/develop youths hardly at all. When he was the head of the state Weightlifting Program, he was simply fed already developed top tier lifters from the underlying local programs/teams.

    I mean, this is like asking a Chinese WL or gymnastics coach the same question about when a kid should start....and including that in your piece as a reference.
    "yes, we rip them away from their families and beat the piss out of them, its fine. We have no problems"

    Also, he was bit behind the curve regarding The Science...
    Dave Spitz: "[ivan requesting steriods] ... When I told him, no, we can't do that here we're playing the game a little different. He requested a goat. The f**k do you want a goat for? Well we need this goat. We need this goat so that we can tie it up in the backyard and we will not feed it. Only water and vitamins. Now. To me I'm thinking what kind of sounds is a goat going to make tied up in a backyard of suburban Benicia, California as it starves for two fucking weeks. Can you imagine the noises coming out of my backyard?
    He wanted to produce a hormone response so that we can slaughter the goat and eat that meat that had a hormone response. When I told him no, when I told him no, he went to work and he created his own supplement from herbs, things that he found at the store and when I came down to breakfast one day he handed me this supplement in the glass. It had like a twig and a berry and it was off color. And as I started to take a sip of the supplement, our big Bulgarian super Nikolai Kristoff's slaps it out of my hand, my friend end, never drink. What Uncle gave this to me, this is fine. HE MAKE IN TOILET! He doesn't mix the shit in the toilet, come on, we're all going to get sick. I go upstairs and there's uncle hovering over his toilet bowl mixing supplements in lieu of the goat."


    Jesus

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    I'm not sure how I missed this before, but I like it. My son is in 5th grade. Currently he's playing baseball and running in a private track club and doing a lot of fun runs, so our focus has been on running and endurance. But he joins pre-athletics in 6th grade to prepare for full time school athletics in 7th grade. So as soon as he is done with his runnings in early May, we will be focusing on his strength so he isn't completely clueless his first day of pre-athletics.

    To start I am going to use a Starting Strength template (I know, I know, I don't wanna hear it) but using a high bar squat. I'll throw in some cleans and maybe snatches if he takes an interest in weightlifting. So far he's seen me do it, but doesn't have a lot of interest other than getting stronger to compete in "traditional" American sports. So we may just stick to power cleans unless he gets the bug and decides to go all in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisG View Post
    I'm not sure how I missed this before, but I like it. My son is in 5th grade. Currently he's playing baseball and running in a private track club and doing a lot of fun runs, so our focus has been on running and endurance. But he joins pre-athletics in 6th grade to prepare for full time school athletics in 7th grade. So as soon as he is done with his runnings in early May, we will be focusing on his strength so he isn't completely clueless his first day of pre-athletics.

    To start I am going to use a Starting Strength template (I know, I know, I don't wanna hear it) but using a high bar squat. I'll throw in some cleans and maybe snatches if he takes an interest in weightlifting. So far he's seen me do it, but doesn't have a lot of interest other than getting stronger to compete in "traditional" American sports. So we may just stick to power cleans unless he gets the bug and decides to go all in.
    MOST young kids don't respond to strength training MUCH.
    The lifts will only go up a little bit, intermittently...
    ...you are only teaching them technique and form really.

    I went into it (training my son) with a mentality if his lifts were so competently executed, the JrHigh and High School coaches would just leave him the fuck alone.

    Regarding SS with HBBS...that's essentially what I did (...still doing, he's 14-1/2 y.o.). I'd mix things up, more deadlifts, and they're more of a clean deadlift. 3s x 5r, heavy enough challenge, but light enough to where the reps all look the same (1st rep to 15th rep).
    Also kid's attention spans suck in general .... so yeah, squats, press, deadlifts ... and then good luck getting much more out of them.
    The SS thing of 3 exercises for 3x5 makes sense, from this standpoint.

    You try to add weight, but it doesn't work so well.
    Think about the leverages the kid is losing as his legs are furiously growing...the geometry around the muscle insertions and origins are basically staying the same as the bones are growing longer... then apply that to everywhere over the body.
    And the fact his body weight in general is going up. Then add whole thing with the hormone profile just isn't there yet...

    I definitely NOT saying give up on weight training, just don't expect to add a ton of weight to the slow lifts (SQ, OHP, DL, BP, etc).
    Could even take "breaks" for months at a time and it won't matter.

    -----------------------

    From a long term sports performance point of view....
    I highly recommend focusing on concentrated controlled sprinting (say 10m-30m for 5th graders/youths), and jumping
    And doing this under a fully recovered state (not running for the sake of conditioning).
    Speed, quickness, and jumping translated to all Sports.

    The kid's nervous system/rate-of-force-development MIGHT be more trainable at these ages moreso than their "muscle-architecture". We kind of know the hormonal stuff isn't there for huge strength gains/muscle size....
    Therefore, it might pay to focus on the other stuff primarily, and weight-training secondarily.

    My 0.02$

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